Computing & Communications

Computing & Communications

SNS looks at the future of everything in these core target areas of interest, from chip designs to high-performance computing, from cloud structure to wireless and software.

 

Choose

Topics in This Focus Channel

  • Protecting Your Crown Jewel IP

    September 29, 2016

    Protecting Your Crown Jewel IP: INVNT/IP on 60 Minutes and "Operation BedBug - China's Ongoing Threat to Global Trade Secrets" With Dan McGahn, President and CEO, American Superconductor; Evan Anderson, INVNT/IP Director of Research, Strategic News Service; and Richard H.L. Marshall, CEO, X-SES Consultants LLC; hosted by Jeff Hudson, CEO, Venafi


    Share this: Share on Facebook Tweet about this on Twitter Share on Google+ Share on LinkedIn Email this to someone
  • Digitalization, the Cloud, and the Transformation of the 21st Century Enterprise

    September 28, 2016

    With R. Preston McAfee, Chief Economist and VP, Microsoft; Michael Schwarz, Chief Scientist for Waze, Google; Mark Sunday, SVP and CIO, Oracle America; James Urquhart, SVP of Performance Analytics, SOASTA Inc.; Tim FitzGerald, Vice President, Digital Transformation, Avnet Technology Solutions, Americas; and Edy Liongosari, Chief Research Scientist and Managing Director, Accenture hosted by Greg Ness, VP, WorldWide Marketing, CloudVelox, and SNS Ambassador for Cloud Computing


    Share this: Share on Facebook Tweet about this on Twitter Share on Google+ Share on LinkedIn Email this to someone
  • The Irresistible Forces Behind ‘Flow Computing’

    September 28, 2016

    With Larry Smarr, Director, Calit2 (a UC San Diego / UC Irvine partnership), and SNS Ambassador for Pure Science; hosted by Mark Anderson


    Share this: Share on Facebook Tweet about this on Twitter Share on Google+ Share on LinkedIn Email this to someone
  • Visualizing Flows in Nature and Data

    September 28, 2016

    With Chris Johnson, Director, Scientific Computing and Imaging Institute (SCI), and Distinguished Professor, School of Computing, University of Utah; Alexander Lex, Assistant Professor of Computer Science at the Scientific Computing and Imaging Institute (SCI) and the School of Computing at the University of Utah and Bei Wang Phillips, Assistant Professor, School of Computing and Scientific Computing and Imaging Institute (SCI), University of Utah; Hosted by Mark Anderson


    Share this: Share on Facebook Tweet about this on Twitter Share on Google+ Share on LinkedIn Email this to someone
  • Machine Intelligence in a Noisy and Dangerous World

    October 9, 2015

    A discussion with Daniel Goldin, Founder, Chairman, and CEO, Intellisis Corp., and NASA Administrator to 3 US presidents and Larry Smarr, Founding Director, Calit2 (a UCSD / UCI partnership)


    Share this: Share on Facebook Tweet about this on Twitter Share on Google+ Share on LinkedIn Email this to someone
  • Machines Learning About People: What’s Next?

    October 8, 2015

    A discussion with Joseph Smarr, Senior Staff Software Engineer and "Stories" Project Lead, Google and Ed Butler, Senior Broadcast Journalist, BBC


    Share this: Share on Facebook Tweet about this on Twitter Share on Google+ Share on LinkedIn Email this to someone
  • The Cloud and the Enterprise: New IT Operating Models

    October 8, 2015

    A panel discussion with James Staten, Chief Strategist, Cloud+Enterprise, Microsoft; Saravan Rajendran, VP and GM, Cloud and Virtualization Group, Cisco; Steve Daheb, SVP, Oracle Cloud, Oracle Corp.; Hosted by Greg Ness, Vice President of Marketing, CloudVelox, and SNS Ambassador for Cloud Computing


    Share this: Share on Facebook Tweet about this on Twitter Share on Google+ Share on LinkedIn Email this to someone
  • Building the Pattern Recognition Lab

    October 7, 2015

    SNS and UC San Diego create a new FiRe Lab: A Pattern Recognition Laboratory (PRL) based on brain-inspired processors and housed in Calit2's Qualcomm Institute With Larry Smarr, Founding Director, Calit2 (a UCSD / UCI partnership) and Mark Anderson Discussion: "Building the Pattern Recognition Lab": With Ken Kreutz-Delgado, Professor of Intelligent Systems, Signal Processing, and Robotics, Jacobs School of Engineering, UCSD; Akihiro Nakao, Professor of Applied Computer Science, University of Tokyo; and Mark Anderson


    Share this: Share on Facebook Tweet about this on Twitter Share on Google+ Share on LinkedIn Email this to someone
  • Creating a Blended Reality: 3D Transformations

    October 7, 2015

    A Centerpiece Conversation: "Creating a Blended Reality: 3D Transformations": With Shane Wall, CTO, Hewlett-Packard; Hosted by Ed Butler, Senior Broadcast Journalist, BBC


    Share this: Share on Facebook Tweet about this on Twitter Share on Google+ Share on LinkedIn Email this to someone
  • Look Out, Siri! Here Comes Hound (on Apple)! (The Next-Generation Internet Assistant)

    October 7, 2015

    A discussion with Tim Stonehocker, CTO, SoundHound; and Kamran Elahian, Co-Founder and Chairman of Global Catalyst Partners, and a Founding Investor and Director of SoundHound; Hosted by Brett Horvath, Co-Founder, Scout


    Share this: Share on Facebook Tweet about this on Twitter Share on Google+ Share on LinkedIn Email this to someone
  • The World’s First Pattern Recognition Processor: The TrueNorth Chip

    October 7, 2015

    A Centerpiece Conversation: "The World's First Pattern Recognition Processor: The TrueNorth Chip: With Dharmendra Modha, IBM Fellow and IBM Chief Scientist, Brain-Inspired Computing and Mark Anderson


    Share this: Share on Facebook Tweet about this on Twitter Share on Google+ Share on LinkedIn Email this to someone
  • SNS: Special Letter: Designing the Next Internets

    July 23, 2015

    Volume 18, Issue 27
    Week of July 22, 2015

    In This Issue
    Feature: Special Letter: Designing The Next Internets
    • The Inherent Flaw in Today's Internet Security Models
    • Offense vs. Defense
    • The Reprivata "Shift" Solution
    • Securing Nets Now
    • About Daniel Gasparro
    ----
    Publisher's Note: Most informed telecoms engineers (and technically sophisticated Net users) have come to the conclusion that security on the Internet, as it's designed today, ranges from the impractical to the impossible. Sure, the NSA and Snowden's leaks have led the big tech companies to look at (and implement) end-to-end encryption, something FBI director Jim Comey lamented in a speech last night as being "uncrackable" by his teams, at least in the mobile messaging world.But the sad state of affairs in most Net-based communications is that they are completely fraught, with near-zero chance of real security.Many now believe that we will have to either re-deploy a new Net, designed from the beginning to be secure, or that there will be private, secure Nets operating side by side with the insecure, public Internet.In either scenario, the ideas and solutions put forward in today's issue, by a global expert on network security, provide a ray of hope, and a path to follow, in moving from complete insecurity to relatively safe and secure communications. Personally, I can't wait. - mra. 


    Share this: Share on Facebook Tweet about this on Twitter Share on Google+ Share on LinkedIn Email this to someone
  • SNS: Special Letter: Frictionless Commerce

    June 3, 2015

    Volume 18, Issue 21
    Week of June 1, 2015

    In This Issue
    Feature: Special Letter: Frictionless Commerce
    • The Problem: Transactions Today Need to Be Frictionless
    • We Have Already Failed
    • Uber Rules: The E-Commerce Relationship Has Changed
    • The Smart Response?
    • Your Voice Is Your Identity
    • Voice Biometrics: Much More Than a Recording
    • The Transforming Value of Voice Biometrics
    • What Does the Future Hold?
    • About Shawn Edmunds

    ----

    Publisher's Note: We know what the problem underlying e-commerce is, in broad terms: technical security is increasingly difficult, and users are increasingly needful of simpler solutions. As we all know, this provides a goldmine for thieves and fraudsters.

    In this discussion, SNS members will learn how our voices can become the centerpiece for e-commerce security. Is this achievable? Indeed, it is more likely inevitable. - mra.


    Share this: Share on Facebook Tweet about this on Twitter Share on Google+ Share on LinkedIn Email this to someone
  • SNS: Pattern Recognition: AI for the Next IA

    May 28, 2015

    Volume 18, Issue 20
    Week of May 25, 2015

    In This Issue
    Feature: Pattern Recognition: AI for the Next IA
    • The Human Side
    • Needs vs. Wants
    • Humans As Relationships
    • The Machine
    • The Human / Machine Relationship
    • Machine Love

    Quotes of the Week
    Takeout Window
    • Naikon Espionage Group vs. ASEAN
    • LG's New OLED TVs
    • Viv: The Great Internet Assistant?
    • Cloud-Based IoT Security
    • 3D Printing with Graphene: We're Getting Closer ----

    Upgrades and Numbers
    • Netflix Neutered?
    • Sherry Chen: "Not Charged" Is Different from "Not Guilty"
    • HP: Selling Out or Pushed Out?
    • Tech Bubble: Yes
    • Housing: It's Different This Time
    • China Crash? Yes (Kind Of)
    • RICK, Not BRIC
    • Phabs: CarryAlongs Split by Age
    • The UK in the EU: Yes
    • The US and Chinese Equity Markets
    • Charter Bid for Time Warner: An FCC Pass

    Ethermail
    ----

    It turns out that the same skills I've been using and espousing since 1995 - based on pattern recognition - are those that have provided the breakthrough in AI, and, soon, in the next Internet Assistant.No matter what one calls the latest wave of assistants - Internet Assistants (our term), Intelligent Assistants, Conversational Assistants (Viv Labs' term), Personal Assistants - or what name one gives them (Siri, Ava, Alex, Cortana, Google Now), it's clear that we want to think of them as fellow human beings, trapped in a box and awaiting our every command.This is not the case.


    Share this: Share on Facebook Tweet about this on Twitter Share on Google+ Share on LinkedIn Email this to someone
  • SNS: Security, Risk, and Software

    May 14, 2015

    Volume 18, Issue 18
    Week of May 11, 2015

    In This Issue
    Feature: Security, Risk, And Software: Protecting Crown Jewels From State-Sponsored Theft
    Quotes of the Week
    Takeout Window
    • "Island Carriers": The (Illegal) Islands China Is Building for Air and Navy Support
    • The Chinese Yuan: The World's Most Manipulated Currency

    Upgrades and Numbers
    • The Alibaba IPO, Revisited
    • Cars and Maps
    • The IMF and the Yuan

    Ethermail

    ------

    Takeaway Points:
    • Economically caused problems can't be solved with better cyber techniques.
    • If this problem isn't fixed, everybody loses: all those in the audience, all of America, and all "inventing nations."
    • Biggest problem is CEO denial.
    • IP isn't just patents, trademarks, and copyrights; it's whatever your business puts behind closed doors to maintain a differentiable competitive advantage.
    • If you bring electronics to China, they will be stripped. It's just the business model; critical to understand that this will happen.
    • If the PLA wants to get into your company, they will. Nothing you can buy will solve that problem.
    • There are 402 US industry targets on China's list.
    • All the laws of physics emerge from the properties of otherwise-empty space.
    • The oil game is a game. It's not about the amount of oil in the ground, but about price control.
    • If every world leader could say: "I'm turning off CO2 from all smokestacks," it would change global agenda so we could move on from climate change and focus on other big problems. The Trifecta Proposal would make this possible.


    Share this: Share on Facebook Tweet about this on Twitter Share on Google+ Share on LinkedIn Email this to someone
  • SNS: 10 Global Tech Trends Off The Mainstream Radar

    May 6, 2015

    Volume 18, Issue 14
    Week of April 20, 2015

    In This Issue
    Feature: 10 Global Tech Trends Off The Mainstream Radar
    Quotes of the Week
    Upgrades and Numbers
    • Carbon Chips
    • Taking Graphene Chips for a Spin

    Ethermail

    ----

    I am often asked: "What are you watching now?" This is a tougher question than it may seem, when one is watching hundreds of threads, in a larger number of pattern streams, with an overwhelming amount of detail. This week, I thought I'd boil down my current list to 10 and share them with our members, who will hopefully find them as important and interesting as I.


    Share this: Share on Facebook Tweet about this on Twitter Share on Google+ Share on LinkedIn Email this to someone
  • SNS: The Destruction of the Smartphone Sector?

    April 8, 2015

    Volume 18, Issue 12
    Week of April 6, 2015
    In This Issue
    Feature: The Destruction of the Smartphone Sector?
    • This Week's Takeaway Points
    • How Samsung Won
    • China Makes Its Move
    • The MOTO Story
    • A New Playing Field
    • Apple's Plan
    • Mountain or Barbell?
    • Summary

    Quotes of the Week
    Takeout Window
    • Charts on Smartphone Market Shares

    Upgrades and Numbers
    • The EU vs. Google and Facebook

    Ethermail
    -----

    Most of today's technology leaders would say that smartphones represent the most dynamic, and most strategic, sector on the global economic landscape. Just as the telecommunications equipment sector was red-hot during the initial buildout of the Internet, today all of the action - and a large share of the money - is at the edge, in handheld devices. And as PC sales continue to falter, and global pad sales growth drops back into single digits, it's the constantly upgraded smartphone that provides the gateway to all of the content and services customers use today. Much like routers and switches in an earlier era, smartphones are the gateway to almost everything else.

    Everyone knows that this business is booming. Apple just had the best quarter in global corporate history, and passed Samsung in Q4 as the world leader in shipments - having already led in revenues. The Mobile World Congress, smartphone watering hole for the planet, was packed as never before - even if there were complaints of a lack of innovation.There are more smartphone makers showing up every day, and more in play today than ever before. It seems that every human on the planet is heading toward being a smartphone owner, every business an advertiser or content provider, every entertainment and media company re-jiggering formats to fit its small screen, and every bank and credit card company shaking in fear as these compact computers take over payments.

    If you happen to live on a line between Cupertino and Mountain View - or if you are one of those people who like seeing innovation appropriately rewarded - it probably comes as a source of great satisfaction that 96% of all smartphone operating system sales for 2014 involved either the Apple iOS or Google's Android OS. What could possibly go wrong?


    Share this: Share on Facebook Tweet about this on Twitter Share on Google+ Share on LinkedIn Email this to someone
  • SNS: What Will Go Wrong: A Cyber Warning

    March 4, 2015

    Volume 18, Issue 8
    Week of February 23, 2015
    In This Issue
    Feature: What Will Go Wrong: A Cyber Warning
    • What Makes "Zero Days" Interesting
    • You Call It Adware, I Call It Illegal Entry
    • Lenovo and Superfish
    • Everything Is Crypto, Everything Is Hacked
    • Hacking Hardware
    • The Equation Group: Spying vs. Stealing
    • Enter Regin
    • From Mass Targets to Massive Targets
    • Cyber Vaccines
    • The Secure PC

    Quotes Of The Week
    Takeout Window
    • A Look at Regin
    • Phishing Trends

    Upgrades And Numbers
    • The FCC Does IT

    Ethermail
    ----

    During an early Future in Review (FiRe) conference, I asked my friend Joi Ito, now head of the MIT Media Lab, what he thought of a certain Japanese prime minister. Without a moment's hesitation, he answered: "BM, or AM?" When I didn't get it, he explained: Before the Motorcade, or After the Motorcade?In the cyber world today, all of the answers that work seem to be "After the Motorcade. "Saying that corporations - or governments - are poor at preventing cyber attacks would be too kind. In general, they just can't do it.After an attack, we have a number of firms that are increasingly expert at describing the forensics, answering questions like "Who did it, when, what did they take?" While this is helpful, it's a bit like showing up at the bomb scene with one's top detective squad. The damage is already done.I have recently expressed my personal (and professional) frustrations over this situation by questioning the wisdom of building out the Net, in its current form. It's kind of like building a road system at great cost, buying a new bus to go from A to B, and then watching the five paying customers suddenly overwhelmed by 100 drug cartel members - with 500 more just behind them, waiting in the hills for the next bus. Neither time nor the numbers are on the side of the good guys.Will individuals be safer tomorrow compared with today? No. Will banks, or hospitals, or national energy grids? Not that I can see.


    Share this: Share on Facebook Tweet about this on Twitter Share on Google+ Share on LinkedIn Email this to someone
  • SNS: A Centerpiece Conversation With Mark Hurd

    February 12, 2015

    Volume 18, Issue 6
    Week of February 9, 2015

    In This Issue
    Feature: A Centerpiece Conversation With Mark Hurd, CEO, Oracle
    Hosted By Mark Anderson
    At The Inaugural SNS Predictions : West
    • About Mark Hurd

    ---

    Publisher's Note: Last week, at our first-ever Predictions : West event, in San Francisco, I had the pleasure of interviewing my friend and guest Oracle CEO Mark Hurd. This is now the third or fourth time I've had the opportunity to interview Mark, and each time I learn something new - not just about Oracle, which one expects, but about larger issues in the worlds of sales, marketing, operations, management, and even human psychology.

    This interview was no exception, and members will find that, while we had a great time moving very quickly through cloud computing, Platform as a Service, security, data center management, hardware and software optimization, and other technical issues, plenty of unexpected gems came out in the same half hour, such as understanding Mark's view of the world's demographics in terms of age, income, and sales potential. I think all of our members will enjoy this conversation as much as I did. - mra


    Share this: Share on Facebook Tweet about this on Twitter Share on Google+ Share on LinkedIn Email this to someone
  • SNS: Is the Net at Risk? A Conversation with Vint Cerf

    January 29, 2015

    Volume 18, Issue 4
    Week of January 26, 2015

    In This Issue
    Feature: Is the Net at Risk? A Conversation with Vint Cerf
    • About Vint Cerf

    ----

    Publisher's Note: Anyone paying attention has to be asking the question: Is the Internet today more useful to those intending good, or to those intending harm? For cybertheft, or for commerce? To spies, or to philanthropists? And, most to the point: to spammers, or to "real people"? The answers are not at all clear, and to the degree that they are, they are not comforting. It's almost as though the good guys came in first, doing what (mostly) the Net was built for - reliable communications between all nations, all companies. And then, after a while, we hit the SNS "Barnacle Theory": Any ship left in the water long enough, no matter how beautiful initially, will become so encrusted with parasites that it becomes useless.While the Net is far from useless, one wonders if we aren't seeing a steady degradation, even as we build out faster and better parts of it. We asked Vint Cerf to address questions like these at FiRe, and he did exactly that, in a conversation with the BBC onstage. You'll likely be surprised at his answers. - mra.


    Share this: Share on Facebook Tweet about this on Twitter Share on Google+ Share on LinkedIn Email this to someone
  • SNS: CES and the IoT

    January 8, 2015

    Volume 18, Issue 1
    Week of January 5, 2015

    In This Issue
    Feature: CES and the IoT
    • Competitive Intelligence?
    • What's Not To Like?
    • What's To Like?

    Quotes of the Week
    Takeout Window
    • Cabin Design of the New Mercedes F015 Concept Car, at CES 2015
    • Cartoon of the Week

    Upgrades and Numbers
    • Proteins Carry Code, Too
    • End of the Lizard Squad? By the Finest Squad
    • Slavish Copying 101: China's SAD Path

    Ethermail
    In Case You Missed It...
    SNS Members Making News
    ----

    This week, as 160,000 vendors, buyers, and spies roam the aisles of the Consumer Electronics Show (CES), it seemed like the right time to write about the Internet of Things (IoT) again, using examples from CES to illustrate the creative, exciting ways in which things will talk to, and work with, other things, often with little or no human input.

    Vendors have spent the last few years raising the war chant about the sheer size of this tsunami in intelligent products, with Ericsson (10B) and Cisco (50B and counting) vying for who can cadge together the largest numbers of new dumb / smart nodes on the Net. Everyone knows the numbers don't really matter, as long as there is a "B" in there somewhere. You can just about hear the cash registers clanging (or Apple Paying) in the background.


    Share this: Share on Facebook Tweet about this on Twitter Share on Google+ Share on LinkedIn Email this to someone
  • SNS: Celebrating The First PRP Chip

    November 26, 2014

    Volume 17, Issue 43
    Week of November 24, 2014

    In This Issue
    Feature: Celebrating The First PRP Chip
    Quotes of the Week
    Takeout Window
    • Core of the TrueNorth Chip in Action
    • The Supporting Technologies In and Behind TrueNorth

    Upgrades And Numbers
    • "Ideas into Actions: Global Threats / Global Solutions"

    Ethermail
    In Case You Missed It...
    SNS Members Making News
    ----

    Cognitive computing has received an increasing amount of attention recently, as those who have been touting the Big Data problem /opportunity have come up against the rather obvious challenge: how to deal with it most effectively? The scientists, academicians, policymakers, and business leaders who worry about these things have been working for years on a large problem set, essentially under the rubric of "brain-inspired computing." These new efforts include new theories about brain function, new MRI and fMRI studies, new work in neural networks and asynchronous computing, new chips, new languages, and new hardware and software on every level.In a sense, these experts have approached the problem by assuming that the brain, as a product of evolution, has achieved goals in low-power, high-performance computing that are so advanced as to deserve biomimetic engineering; and by working to emulate a number of the brain's structures and functions in order to vault modern computing forward by some huge factor.


    Share this: Share on Facebook Tweet about this on Twitter Share on Google+ Share on LinkedIn Email this to someone
  • SNS: Wireless Woes: Demand Slaughters Supply

    November 7, 2014

    Volume 17, Issue 41
    Week of November 3, 2014
    In This Issue
    Feature: Wireless Woes: Demand Slaughters Supply
    • The Great Disconnect
    • The Problem with Mobile: Both "Up To" and "Out To"
    • The Small vs. the Backhaul
    • Enter the Dragons

    Quotes of the Week
    Takeout Window
    • UK 4G/LTE Speeds Dive As Subscribers Increase
    • Going to Small Cells, Buildings First
    • Cisco Fires, Huawei Hires
    • Huawei Makes It, But Who Invented It?
    • Lower Tech: Making Broadband by Aggregating Channels

    Upgrades and Numbers
    • Expanding Distribution of INVNT/IP's "The Pulse"
    • The World's First 3D-Printed Graphene Battery
    • Ferroelectric Transistors?

    Ethermail
    In Case You Missed It...
    SNS Members Making News
    ----

    My flight landed at an international airport recently, and I immediately turned on my smartphone. Plenty of bars, LTE, all good to go, except - nothing was happening. No Net, no email. Was I in the Twilight Zone? No, I was in an airport, which, it turns out, is worse.

    I also recently traveled to Australia, where my Verizon US account turned me over to Optus. In five days on the ground - including downtown Melbourne and Sydney - I never got enough bandwidth to download mail; I had to do all my "real" work through Wi-Fi systems. In a story this week on LTE rollouts - which have already happened all over the continent - it turns out that all of Europe is suffering from a bandwidth shortage.


    Share this: Share on Facebook Tweet about this on Twitter Share on Google+ Share on LinkedIn Email this to someone
  • SNS: Special Letter: Cyber Security in a Mobile World

    October 30, 2014

    Volume 17, Issue 40
    Week of October 27, 2014
    In This Issue
    Feature: Special Letter: Cyber Security in a Mobile World
    • The Times, They Are a' Changin'
    • Cyber Security Opportunities in a Mobile World
    • Mobile Wallets Coming of Age
    • Mobile Cyber Security Challenges
    • Summary

    ----

    Publisher's Note: SNS members are already well aware that the system is broken - that the very infrastructure we have created as an e-commerce highway has turned out to also be the preferred path for thieves and miscreants of every kind. What now? How do we reclaim the use of this beautiful Internet project, when anyone who touches it is increasingly at risk? There are not a great number of satisfactory answers to this question, but surely one of the best begins with the idea of a new Net, based on knowing the difference between the good guys and the bad guys. To that end, using biometrics linked to access on many levels may provide a new path to our safe and secure use of the network we thought, for a few short years, we - the good guys - owned. - mra


    Share this: Share on Facebook Tweet about this on Twitter Share on Google+ Share on LinkedIn Email this to someone
  • SNS: Australia: Dancing in the Deadly Embrace

    October 2, 2014

    Volume 17, Issue 36
    Week of September 29, 2014
    In This Issue
    Feature: Australia: Dancing in the Deadly Embrace
    • Behind the Dance
    • The National Broadband Network
    • Telstra
    • Summary

    Quotes of the Week
    Takeout Window
    • Behind the Dance

    Upgrades And Numbers
    • Australia's Top 25 Exports, Goods, and Services
    • Australia's Top 10 Trading Partners
    • China's Iron Imports, 2009-2014
    • Peak Pricing, Not Peak Oil

    Ethermail
    In Case You Missed It...
    SNS Members Making News

    ----

    In the post-WWII era, Australia has generally had a booming, resource-based economy, driven by everything diggable or drillable, but mostly coal and iron. As China has moved from the Maoist days of a Communist business model with 1.2B dirt farmers into its current Communist Party-controlled Infomercantilist model, the effects of the change on Australia have been dramatic.

    Australia's plans and politics were always driven by the big-money companies involved in resource extraction, but China's dramatic rise in demand for Australia's resources has accelerated payments in cash to this sector, while arguably slowing the country's attempts to diversify - or to do anything the major resource firms don't like.

    In recent history, this has included: responding to global warming with a carbon payments scheme and windfall profits tax on resource firms to diversify the economy (not popular with resource firms: end of Labor government), repeal of same (payback for support: new Liberal administration), and an endless dance with China over resource pricing, deliverables, and ownership.


    Share this: Share on Facebook Tweet about this on Twitter Share on Google+ Share on LinkedIn Email this to someone
  • SNS: The Alibaba IPO: The Other Side

    September 11, 2014

    Volume 17, Issue 34
    Week of September 8, 2014
    In This Issue
    Feature: The Alibaba IPO: The Other Side

    Quotes of the Week
    Takeout Window
    • The 2014 Ebola Outbreak in Western Africa

    Upgrades and Numbers
    • The "Unnovation" Economy: Copying the Thieves
    • T-Mobile Sues Huawei
    • An Open Letter to Petro O. Poroshenko: How Putin Thinks
    • An Open Letter to David Cameron
    • Ebola: Out of Control

    Ethermail
    In Case You Missed It...
    SNS Members Making News
    ----

    Sometime in the next week or two, the most important event since global plates drifted apart will take place - if media coverage is any indicator. I refer, of course, to Alibaba's over-hyped initial public offering (IPO).

    For months now, during a time when most firms in a similar position would be in "quiet period," the company has been running what looks like an intercontinental public relations campaign to make sure it is in the headlines day-in, day-out. No doubt, most of our members are asking: "Should I invest?"In this issue, we won't answer that question (directly). But, unlike all of the major business media, we'll take a colder look at the company and its new offering: no breathless hype, no sycophancy, but a more systematic view of what's happening in, and around, this event.

    Let's look at this story from a number of different viewpoints, and then judge the overall picture when we're done.


    Share this: Share on Facebook Tweet about this on Twitter Share on Google+ Share on LinkedIn Email this to someone
  • SNS: Special Letter: Next-Generation Memory: Enabling Innovation in Electronics

    September 3, 2014

    Volume 17, Issue 33
    Week of September 1, 2014
    In This Issue
    Feature: Special Letter: Next-Generation Memory: Enabling Innovation in Electronics
    • Memory Bottleneck
    • Next-Generation Memory
    • Opportunities and Challenges
    • About Greg Schmergel

    ---

    Publisher's Note: Perhaps a decade ago, I gave a keynote talk to the partners and invested company CEOs of Warburg Pincus, in the old Rainbow Room in New York, as a guest of Bill Janeway. One of the participants was a member of Intel's advisory board, who challenged me during the Q&A on my statement that Moore's Law was safe and sound for the foreseeable future. This was a bit of David taking on Goliath, as I'm sure it seemed to Bill and the other WP partners.

    A few weeks later, Gordon Moore himself announced a new discovery that would allow his law to continue apace - and it has, until now. Those days are over. If we don't find a new technology, such as that described in this week's issue, the course of technological innovation will have to shift from hardware to software, which no one wants to see. Luckily, people like Greg Schmergel are hard at work solving this problem. I think all SNS members will want to understand how we move deep tech from this decade forward. - mra.


    Share this: Share on Facebook Tweet about this on Twitter Share on Google+ Share on LinkedIn Email this to someone
  • SNS: The Future of Consumer Electronics: A Conversation with Gary Shapiro

    August 20, 2014

    Volume 17, Issue 31
    Week of August 18, 2014
    In This Issue
    Feature: The Future of Consumer Electronics: A Conversation with Gary Shapiro
    • About Gary Shapiro
    • About Jim Louderback

    ---

    Publisher's Note: If there is a single person in the world who represents the cutting edge of consumer technology - and the forces that drive the many markets involved - it is Gary Shapiro. As president and CEO of the Consumer Electronics Association, he works overtime to enable increased innovation and to discourage practices like patent trolling and stealing inventions. And as the head of CEA's International Consumer Electronics Show (CES), he provides the largest platform in the world for entrepreneurs and companies to test and sell their latest, most innovative products.There may be no other individual who combines such a commanding and yet objective role on the inventing side of the world, and also has so much interest and commitment to the global political search for encouraging invention and protecting it from copying, re-engineering, and / or theft.SNS members who did not have the benefit of attending FiRe 2014 and seeing Jim Louderback's inspired, high-energy interview of Gary, will benefit now, and likely will immediately recognize a strong connection between Gary's "lessons learned" and our own. Every SNS member, and every member of their teams (for site license holders), will come away from reading this week's issue inspired about our basic task in creating new things and educated in the difficulties of protecting these inventions against nations whose models and cultures are based on theft. - mra.


    Share this: Share on Facebook Tweet about this on Twitter Share on Google+ Share on LinkedIn Email this to someone
  • SNS: Hitting Their Own Walls: The Telecom Struggle

    August 13, 2014

    Volume 17, Issue 30
    Week of August 11, 2014
    In This Issue
    Feature: Hitting Their Own Walls: The Telecom Struggle
    • Part I: Smartphones
    • Part II: Carrier Angst

    Quotes of the Week
    Takeout Window
    • The Verizon vs. AT&T Wireless Maps

    Upgrades and Numbers
    • IBM Makes the SNS PRP Chip!!!
    • Flat Lenses, Cool Optics
    • Forbes Sells Out, Part II

    Ethermail
    In Case You Missed It...
    SNS Members Making News---

    A funny thing happened to South Korea's march toward total domination of the cellphone market: it ran into its own business model, on a much larger scale. A decade or so ago, back when Samsung was No. 5 in the global market, members read here that it would soon become No. 1. Well, as anyone following the company's financials and press will already be aware, Samsung - and fellow South Korean handset makers LG and, in a different way, Pantech - has just run into a buzz saw called China.Pan-who?


    Share this: Share on Facebook Tweet about this on Twitter Share on Google+ Share on LinkedIn Email this to someone
  • SNS: Special Letter Innovations In Cyber Security – An Emerging New Paradigm

    August 6, 2014

    Volume 17, Issue 29
    Week of August 4, 2014
    In This Issue
    Feature: Special Letter Innovations In Cyber Security - An Emerging New Paradigm
    • Cyber Plunder in Perspective
    • A Cat and Mouse Game
    • Protecting the Crown Jewels
    • A New Paradigm
    • Pursuing Opportunities
    • About Steven R. Russo

    ---

    Publisher's Note: There are two chilling trends in Internet security that were underlined this week with the announcement by Hold Security of a Russian crime ring taking around 1.2 billion user names and password combinations from perhaps 420,000 different hacked websites.

    The first is a ramping of theft success on all scores, from personal IDs to nations stealing crown jewel intellectual property, which simply can no longer be tolerated if innovation and commerce are to continue. The second is a massive movement to cloud computing, driven by financial requirements rather than security requirements, at a time when our internal sources indicate that clouds have already been hacked. Now, hold those two thoughts

    ---A few years ago, I was seated next to a top Microsoft engineer, just before he became CTO of one of the largest online firms in the world. As we talked, I laid out a potential new way of securing data, and made him swear he wouldn't take it back to Redmond for copying.

    In today's issue, you will see that idea (and more) applied to cloud security and data protection. To my mind, getting this project done is of the same priority as replacing firewalls and virus lists with heuristic tools for monitoring network penetrations, and convincing CEOs to wake up and take serious action on security (since today their "in-denial" approach is killing their companies). The suggestion made here - that there really is a solution set that works for clouds - is coming none too soon. I hope every member will read on, and, if involved in this effort, take a close look at this great approach. - mra.


    Share this: Share on Facebook Tweet about this on Twitter Share on Google+ Share on LinkedIn Email this to someone
  • SNS: Software Quality vs. Screen Size

    July 16, 2014

    Volume 17, Issue 26
    Week of July 14, 2014

    In This Issue
    Feature: Software Quality vs. Screen Size
    • Small Is Good
    • Big Is Bad
    • Symantec Norton Antivirus
    • Adobe: Pretty Darn Frustrating
    • Apple iTunes
    • Microsoft Internet Explorer
    • Garmin GPS

    Quotes of the Week
    Takeout Window
    • The US Economy
    • The World's Largest Rocket
    • Algenol and Alibaba

    Upgrades and Numbers
    • Nation-Sponsored IP Theft: Start at the Top, Not the Bottom

    Ethermail
    In Case You Missed It...
    SNS Members Making News
    ---

    We live in a time when the hot new thing is software running on data centers that emulate the human brain. Delivered on a small smartphone, the dream is that these programs will brook the Singularity (whatever that is), become both our lover and our assistant (from "Her" to Cortana), and work most of the time. Well, two out of three isn't bad.


    Share this: Share on Facebook Tweet about this on Twitter Share on Google+ Share on LinkedIn Email this to someone
  • SNS: Jeff Bezos in His Prime

    July 2, 2014

    Volume 17, Issue 24
    Week of June 30, 2014
    In This Issue
    Feature: Jeff Bezos in His Prime
    • Like Barnes & Noble?
    • Like Walmart? Like Costco?
    • Like Apple? Like Netflix? Like Microsoft?
    • Like Alibaba?
    • Amazon Prime

    Quotes of the Week
    Takeout Window
    • The "Not Steve" Product Launch Award
    • What Amazon Sells

    Upgrades and Numbers
    • China's "1-Way Trade" Tech Strategy

    Ethermail
    In Case You Missed It...
    SNS Members Making News
    ---

    What is Jeffrey Preston Jorgensen - now Jeff Bezos - thinking? Or, rather: What does Jeff Bezos want? Or, perhaps even more to the point: What doesn't Jeff want? This is the question that all of the world's merchants would like answered. And they are not alone; surely this is also true for the world's banks, film studios, book publishers, authors, credit card companies, clothing manufacturers, and a nearly infinite number of other providers of products and services, all of whose wares will either flow through Amazon or be out-competed by it.


    Share this: Share on Facebook Tweet about this on Twitter Share on Google+ Share on LinkedIn Email this to someone
  • SNS: Commercial Surveillance

    June 18, 2014

    Volume 17, Issue 22
    Week of June 16, 2014
    In This Issue
    Feature: Commercial Surveillance
    • Conditions Set: Maximum Purchase

    Quotes of the Week
    Takeout Window
    • Dell "Gets" Sustainability

    Upgrades and Numbers
    • What Is Elon Thinking?
    • Behind Tesla's Patent-Free Move
    • Hewlett-Packard: From Conundrum to Basket Case

    Ethermail
    In Case You Missed It...
    SNS Members Making News
    ---

    Which are you more concerned about spying on you and your data: national intelligence agencies or corporations? Which do you think knows more about you: the NSA or e-commerce sites?


    Share this: Share on Facebook Tweet about this on Twitter Share on Google+ Share on LinkedIn Email this to someone
  • CTO Design Challenge: Privacy vs. Security: Finding a Technology Solution

    May 23, 2014

    Conclusion: Fire CTO Design Challenge: "Privacy vs. Security: Finding a Technology Solution" The Challenge Judges: Mark Anderson, Founder and Chair, INVNT/IP; Vaclav Vincalek, President, Pacific Coast Information Systems Ltd.; Richard Marshall, CEO, Secure Exchange Technology Innovations; The Challenge Team: Barry Briggs, IT Chief Architect and CTO, Microsoft; Hugh Bradlow, CTO and Head of Innovation, Telstra; Larry Smarr, Director, Calit2, UC San Diego/UC Irvine (HQ Qualcomm Institute), UCSD; Kevin Surace, CEO, Appvance; Simon Aspinall, Chief of Vertical Markets, Strategy, and Marketing, Virtustream; David Schoenberger, CIO/CTO, Secure Cloud Systems; Thomas Aidan Curran, CTO Imarum GmbH


    Share this: Share on Facebook Tweet about this on Twitter Share on Google+ Share on LinkedIn Email this to someone
  • Neal Stephenson: It’s time to grow past ‘silly little apps’

    May 23, 2014

    "Looking Further": With Neal Stephenson; hosted by David Brin


    Share this: Share on Facebook Tweet about this on Twitter Share on Google+ Share on LinkedIn Email this to someone
  • Creating the Next Generation of Internet Assistants

    May 22, 2014

    With Daniel Faulkner, VP Marketing & Strategy, Nuance Communications; hosted David Ewing Duncan, Author and Correspondent, The Atlantic


    Share this: Share on Facebook Tweet about this on Twitter Share on Google+ Share on LinkedIn Email this to someone
  • Artificial Intelligence Helping Humans: Future Research

    May 21, 2014

    A discussion with Peter Lee, Corporate VP and Head of Microsoft Research, Microsoft; hosted by Ed Butler, Presenter, BBC


    Share this: Share on Facebook Tweet about this on Twitter Share on Google+ Share on LinkedIn Email this to someone
  • Centerpiece Conversation with Mark Hurd

    May 21, 2014

    Centerpiece Conversation with Mark Hurd, President, Oracle: Hosted by Mark Anderson


    Share this: Share on Facebook Tweet about this on Twitter Share on Google+ Share on LinkedIn Email this to someone
  • SNS: The Real Security Problem: People

    May 8, 2014

    Volume 17, Issue 18
    Week of May 5, 2014
    In This Issue
    Feature: The Real Security Problem: People
    • Bad News, Good News
    • The Target Effect: Another NSA-Like Turning Point?
    • Citizens and Governments
    • Separating Privacy from Theft The EU's Challenge
    • A Different Reality

    Quotes of the Week
    Takeout Window
    • Arms and Opinions
    • Tesla Shares: Kimbal Musk Sells 5k Units, Keeping 170K

    Upgrades and Numbers
    • Tech Stocks Self-Divide
    • Tesla Numbers

    Ethermail
    In Case You Missed It...
    SNS Members Making News
    ---

    The collapse of the old-style security firms that we predicted a few months ago is now well under way, with the largest of these talking publicly about the demise of their own model (see "Quotes of the Week"). The CEO of Target has been fired in the very first modern case of a corporate chief getting the axe over a security lapse. New bugs such as Heartbleed are so embedded in our systems that it will take years (if at all) to remove them, while we hasten the build-out of an extended Internet of Things with little or no security. Someone, please, stop the train. 


    Share this: Share on Facebook Tweet about this on Twitter Share on Google+ Share on LinkedIn Email this to someone
  • SNS: The Internet of Other Things

    April 24, 2014

    Volume 17, Issue 16
    Week of April 21, 2014
    In This Issue
    Feature: The Internet of Other Things
    • E-Commerce
    • Email
    • ID Theft
    • Video and Audio Piracy
    • Trade Secrets
    • The Internet of Other Things
    • Summary

    Quotes of the Week
    Takeout Window
    • Intel's Chip Results, As Income and Revenue per Sector

    Upgrades and Numbers
    • Intel Numbers
    • Russia and History Lesson No. 1: Chechnya, Crimea, and Ukraine
    • NSA/Snowden and History Lesson No. 2: Echelon
    • Here Comes 5G: Less About Frequencies, More About Bandwidth

    Ethermail
    In Case You Missed It...
    SNS Members Making News
    ---

    There is no question that the large ship of technology funding and planning has shifted toward the Internet of Things. From the smallest startups (remember cute little NEST?) to the largest IT companies in the world, the IoT has taken front-and-center interest among those planning on making near-term profits as every possible device becomes smart and connected. This parade of technical progress, driven almost entirely by the expansion of the Internet, has reached into every part of global commerce and individual lives, and there is no debate about the power and benefits this expansion has allowed. From SNS member and Oracle president Mark Hurd's description in last week's issue of how enterprise employees are empowered by the IoT, to startup SpaceCurve's new platform for real-time management of the Big Data that IoT will bring, the world of technology is rapidly transforming to mirror the challenges and benefits of the IoT.


    Share this: Share on Facebook Tweet about this on Twitter Share on Google+ Share on LinkedIn Email this to someone
  • SNS: Special Letter: The Internet of Things is Really the Internet of People

    April 15, 2014

    Volume 17, Issue 15
    Week of April 14, 2014
    In This Issue
    Feature: Special Letter: The Internet of Things is Really the Internet of People
    • Great Technological Vision and Innovation Won't Be Enough
    • What Might These New-Wave Jobs Look Like?
    • What the CEO Needs to Do
    • About Mark Hurd

    ---

    Publisher's Note: Mark Hurd has already proved that he can run the largest technology companies in the world, and make money doing it. Given his combined experiences at Oracle, Hewlett-Packard, and NCR, I would guess there are few-to-none others with the combined operating experience Mark brings to the job every morning.Having said this, I think our members will find this week's issue doubly important, as Mark goes beyond the Big Data discussions we've all read to an on-the-ground series of examples of what the new Internet of Things will mean in real business settings, and - most interesting of all - handled by real people. Too often these days we find ourselves reading breathless futuristic descriptions of the IoT, without business pragmatism or any human anchoring to create a real sense of what the challenges and opportunities will be inside this new world, how people will manage them, and exactly what kind of people will be needed to do it. There is no doubt we will be following this technology - and human - road map. But there remains a lot of difficulty, I think, in understanding how best to approach the experience. I expect members will find that Mark has brought us all a much-needed guide, as useful as it is fascinating. - mra.


    Share this: Share on Facebook Tweet about this on Twitter Share on Google+ Share on LinkedIn Email this to someone
  • SNS: The New Insecurity And INVNT/IP

    March 5, 2014

    Volume 17, Issue 9
    Week of March 3, 2014
    In This Issue
    Feature:
    The New Insecurity And INVNT/IP
    • Soundproofed Rooms, Secret Conversations
    • Modern Threats
    • The Age of INSecurity
    • Ranking Thief Nations
    • A World of Proxie?
    • Solving the Problem(s)
    • The Barnacle Theory
    • Inventing INVNT/IP

    Quotes of the Week
    Upgrades
    • Bitcoins: SNS Members Getting Out Whole
    • Move Over, Siri? Here Comes Cortana
    • The New IBM Grapene Chip
    • Ohhh, You Did It for the Money

    Takeout Window
    • Abenomics: The End of the Sugar High

    Ethermail
    In Case You Missed It...
    Members Making News
    ---

    As CEO of the new INVNT/IP Consortium, I was in Washington, DC, for a week, visiting Cabinet-level officials to bring them a new message: the nation-sponsored cyber attacks on US corporations are not the result of a purely military plan, but of a new national business model. The perpetrators aren't stealing military secrets alone, but rather have expanded to stealing commercial crown jewel intellectual property. The challenge has moved from beefing up security for some future military attack to not losing commercial advantage in real time.

    To close the circle, I suggested that the result of this new onslaught - the erosion or destruction of return on investment (ROI) in our invention-based economy - was perhaps our greatest national security issue. Everyone present agreed.


    Share this: Share on Facebook Tweet about this on Twitter Share on Google+ Share on LinkedIn Email this to someone
  • SNS: Special Letter: The Impact and Evolution of Mobile Communications

    February 26, 2014

    Volume 17, Issue 8
    Week of February 24, 2014

    In This Issue
    Feature: Special Letter: The Impact and Evolution of Mobile Communications
    • Mobile As the Great Enabler
    • Smart Mobile People
    • Smart Mobile Things
    • Technology Revolution
    • Characterizing the Impact
    • Optimizing the Future
    • About Mary Jesse

    ---

    Publisher's Note: When one enters a world as strategically important as "the future of wireless," there are a growing number of specialists, a vast number of wannabe experts, and a few people who really understand the potentials of the technology, from both a use case and a technical perspective. I've found that those in this last group are often pioneers, part of the early teams who had to build cellular networks and devices from the bottom up. They also, for this reason, often come from one of two places: San Diego, the home of mobile chip giant Qualcomm, or Seattle/Bellevue, the home of the first cellular companies in the world. Like the "eBay Mafia" in the Bay Area, McCaw Cellular has left in its wake tens or hundreds of companies started by those who were involved early in Craig McCaw's exploits. Companies such as Cellular One, AT&T Wireless, Western Wireless, and T-Mobile come to mind, but there are countless more, and more pioneers beyond that who have been recruited by the "hoovering branches" (recruiting-driven offices) of Google, Twitter, Facebook, and other Valley firms looking to Seattle/Bellevue for mobile expertise. Mary Jesse's pedigree fits all of these sought-after descriptions, and more: as founder, chair, and CEO of Ivycorp, she also runs one of this year's special FiReStarter Companies, which we will showcase at FiRe 2014. And while I have no doubt that our members will quickly come to appreciate Mary's experience and "DNA" for the world of mobile and where it is going, I believe that it is her obvious intelligence that makes Mary, and the views she expresses here, most valuable. All in all, this is one of the best pieces I have read on the sharpest end of the technology spear, and it is no surprise that Mary is the author. Mobile now drives almost every part of the computing and communications product portfolio, and those who wish to get a deeper understanding of its direction will be glad they read this week's issue. - mra.


    Share this: Share on Facebook Tweet about this on Twitter Share on Google+ Share on LinkedIn Email this to someone
  • SNS: Balkanizing The Net: Benefits and Costs

    February 19, 2014

    Volume 17, Issue 7
    Week of February 17, 2014
    In This Issue
    Feature: Balkanizing The Net: Benefits and Costs
    • Benefits
    • Costs
    • Summary

    Quotes of the Week
    Upgrades
    • China Hitting the Great Wall
    • Redefining the Human Immune System: The Most Exciting Idea of the Decade?

    Takeout Window
    • Abenomics: The End of the Sugar High

    Ethermail
    In Case You Missed It...
    Members Making News
    ---

    My friend and SNS member Vint Cerf, in a terrific interview by Larry Smarr at FiRe 2013, described the experience of launching the Internet. And while he addressed many of the changes and pressures involved in its evolution, the idea that any country would just take it over was never part of the plan. (I am happy to announce that Vint will be returning to FiRe 2014.) When politicians from democratic countries first considered the effects of the Net on China, their naive assumption was that more information would be brought into this closed society, and thereby increase the ultimate chances for democracy and free speech. Very quickly, it became clear that just the opposite was true: the leaders of China used the "Great Firewall" to shut off all contact between citizens and any websites, stories, even words deemed not in the national interest. Worse, the system became the perfect surveillance tool to detect, and then often detain, political dissidents of even the most mild nature.Instead of promoting freedom, ChinaNet became the primary tool in an increasingly repressive society, under both Hu Jin Tao and now Xi Jinping.


    Share this: Share on Facebook Tweet about this on Twitter Share on Google+ Share on LinkedIn Email this to someone
  • SNS: Satya’s Challenge: What Microsoft Faces

    February 6, 2014

    Volume 17, Issue 5
    Week of February 3, 2014
    In This Issue
    Feature: Satya's Challenge: What Microsoft Faces
    Quotes of the Week
    Upgrades
    • The Real Google Motorola Story
    • Auto Judo: The Japanese Fuel-Cell Cars Arrive

    Takeout Window
    • The Big Four: The New Microsoft Power Team
    • The Global Economy: Why Worry?

    Ethermail
    In Case You Missed It...
    Members Making News
    ---

    The problem for Microsoft has never been making money; Steve Ballmer proved that beyond a doubt. Rather, the company's historic challenge (other than avoiding Justice Department dismembering) has been to convince investors that a fast- (or slow-) follower business model deserves increasing valuations. Wall Street's clear answer to date has been "No."

    That was before the world got much more complicated. 


    Share this: Share on Facebook Tweet about this on Twitter Share on Google+ Share on LinkedIn Email this to someone
  • SNS: E-Commerce in Crisis

    January 23, 2014

    Volume 17, Issue 3
    Week of January 20, 2014
    In This Issue
    Feature: E-Commerce in Crisis
    • The Inflation of Credit Card Theft
    • Wired South Korea
    • Chips: So Yesterday
    • Spying vs. Stealing
    • Solutions

    Quotes Of The Week
    Upgrades
    • China Banks: The Plumbing Backs Up

    Takeout Window
    • CarryAlongs Carry the Quarter, and Amazon Owns Christmas
    • Falling Indebtedness: Largely Due to Defaults, Not Repayment
    • South Korean Officials Resign After Credit Card Hack

    Ethermail
    In Case You Missed It...
    Members Making News
    ---

    A funny thing happened on the path to putting all business and banking online: the same access that makes it attractive to E-Commerce vendors and customers makes it even more attractive to thieves. We're approaching a moment when the question of which group shares more risk, and which benefits most, is flipping. The thieves are winning.


    Share this: Share on Facebook Tweet about this on Twitter Share on Google+ Share on LinkedIn Email this to someone
  • SNS: A Conversation About MALT, Part II

    January 13, 2014

    Volume 17, Issue 2
    Week of January 13, 2014
    SNS: A Conversation About MALT, Part II
    ---

    In our first transcript on MALT, we laid the foundation for the concept that the smartphone platform is the most important real estate in technology. Here, in the second part, we address how this integrates with the details or our MALT concept. Together, these conversations should work as a pair to explain this global revolution in retail and services. - mra.
    ----

    This week I am pleased to share a private transcript of my recent conference call with UBS and selected clients, in which we take a deeper dive into the SNS MALT (Micromapping, Advertising, Location and ID, and Transaction) technology vision / business opportunity set, and into the thinking around the SNS 2014 Predictions. I want to thank member Steve Milunovich, Senior IT Hardware analyst at UBS, for his interest in the MALT concept, and for permission to circulate this private transcript to our members. MALT appears to be catching the interest of an increasing number of analysts, reporters, and entrepreneurs, and I hope that our members are able to convert it into a reasonable part of their 2014 revenue streams. At the end of this piece, you'll find a conversation with Steve on interpreting our prediction set for 2014 from an investor's perspective. - Mark Anderson, Publisher and CEO, Strategic News Service.


    Share this: Share on Facebook Tweet about this on Twitter Share on Google+ Share on LinkedIn Email this to someone
  • SNS: A Conversation About MALT

    January 8, 2014

    Volume 17, Issue 1
    Week of January 6, 2014
    In This Issue
    Feature: A Conversation About MALT
    • Google's mistake has moved power to Asia
    • China's business model could win
    • Six smartphone killer apps
    • Concerned about Apples

    ---

    This week I am pleased to share a private transcript of my recent conference call with UBS and selected clients, in which we take a deeper dive into the SNS MALT (Micromapping, Advertising, Location and ID, and Transaction) technology vision / business opportunity set, and into the thinking around the SNS 2014 Predictions. I want to thank member Steve Milunovich, senior hardware analyst at UBS, for his interest in the MALT concept, and for permission to circulate this private transcript to our members.

    MALT appears to be catching the interest of an increasing number of analysts, reporters, and entrepreneurs, and I hope that our members are able to convert it into a reasonable part of their 2014 revenue streams. - Mark Anderson, Publisher and CEO, Strategic News Service.


    Share this: Share on Facebook Tweet about this on Twitter Share on Google+ Share on LinkedIn Email this to someone
  • SNS: The Future of Bitcoin

    December 19, 2013

    Volume 16, Issue 45
    Week of December 16, 2013
    In This Issue
    Feature: The Future of Bitcoin
    • Benefits of a Digital Currency
    • Dangers of a Digital Currency
    • The Country View: What Is a Currency For?
    • The Valley Goes Bitcoin

    Quotes of the Week
    Takeout Window
    • Diagram of a Bitcoin Transaction

    Ethermail
    In Case You Missed It...
    Members Making News
    ---

    If you've never heard of Satoshi Nakamoto, that's no excuse, even if the likelihood of his existence is close to zero. There is an exponentially growing crowd of investors in the Bitcoin system who hope - and perhaps believe - that this digital currency will prove more substantial than the pseudonymous name of its inventor. Hardly a day passes when I am not asked what I think about Bitcoin - as a technology, as an investment, as a currency for transactions, perhaps even as the coolest thing to talk about over this year's turn at holiday cocktail parties. But, as news comedian Jon Stewart once pointed out to over-the-top TV stock-picker Jim Cramer after listing his failures and statistical losses: "It's not a game." At least, not to the newbies now piling into Bitcoins without a much better chance of understanding what they own, or what to expect, than if they were purchasing shares of neutrinos.


    Share this: Share on Facebook Tweet about this on Twitter Share on Google+ Share on LinkedIn Email this to someone
  • SNS: MALT: A New Killer Category

    November 21, 2013

    Volume 16, Issue 42
    Week of November 18, 2013

    In This Issue
    Feature: MALT: A New Killer Category
    • Micromapping and Advertising: Love and Marriage
    • Location
    • Transactions
    • MALT: The New Killer Category

    Quotes of the Week
    Upgrades
    • China Threatens the World
    • Cisco Numbers: We Warned You, John
    • The Kennedy Assassination Demystified

    Takeout Window
    • Recent Figures on Chinese Fraud
    • The New Microsoft:The Microsoft Cybercrime Center
    • Magnets vs. Transistors
    • Japan: The Whale Meat Business in Color (Research Not)

    Ethermail
    In Case You Missed It...
    Members Making News
    ---

    I love surprises. But I also know that the opposite is true for technology and finance executives. There is an entirely new category of wireless smartphone applications about to be launched, with the potential of making staggering amounts of money. The entrenched players will fight tooth and nail, and the international stakes for money and power are enormous. The technology would appear to have been virtually all finished, and the initial rollout is done. Yet no one has heard about it. Surprise!But wait - there's more: I'm not sure that even the company behind it knows what it has. One reason to consider that indeed it might? The comparative stealth, until now, of this whole project.


    Share this: Share on Facebook Tweet about this on Twitter Share on Google+ Share on LinkedIn Email this to someone
  • SNS: Q4 2013: Wireless AORTA: The Fourth Place

    November 7, 2013

    Volume 16, Issue 40
    Week of November 4, 2013
    In This Issue
    Feature: Q4 2013: Wireless AORTA: The Fourth Place
    • Defining the Bandwidth
    • "The Fourth Place": You

    Quotes of the Week
    Upgrades
    • The Chinese National Business Model: Foreigners Out?
    • The Science of Internet Assistance, According to Allen

    Takeout Window
    • The H1B Visa Problem: Lying About Use
    • Turning a Bad Idea into a Dangerous One

    In Case You Missed It...
    Members Making News
    ---

    There are many times when technological change brings unintended consequences. As we move into an era of very high bandwidth everywhere, everything is about to change. At this stage in global technological history, most of us are used to the idea of wireless access to the Internet. What we are not quite prepared for is the phase we are entering now: wireless communications with such high bandwidth that its use becomes purely reflexive, a natural part of our behavior. Moreover, while we are used to having "good" bandwidth in hotspots here and there, virtually none of us is quite prepared for a world in which our bandwidth is transformed from an "island-hopping" experience to an expected aspect of the environment.Having experienced what Always On Real Time Access (AORTA) feels like in the wired world, we are now about to have the same bandwidth exposure through a ubiquitous wireless infrastructure. More important, the coming era of Wireless AORTA is about to completely change how we behave, and how we relate to both the world of bits and the world of atoms.


    Share this: Share on Facebook Tweet about this on Twitter Share on Google+ Share on LinkedIn Email this to someone
  • SNS: Special Letter: Finding Security in the Cloud

    October 30, 2013

    Volume 16, Issue 39
    Week of October 28, 2013
    In This Issue
    Feature: Special Letter: Finding Security in the Cloud
    • The Sixties and the Cloud
    • The Rise of the "As-a-Service" Model
    • Enter the Enterprise-Class Cloud
    • Key Tenets of the Enterprise-Class Cloud
    • "Cloud" Is Different Things to Different People
    • Lessons from History
    • Bonus Materials
    • About Simon Aspinall

    ---

    Publisher's Note: SNS members may recall our first meetings on cloud computing at the Future in Review conference, back before most people had even heard of this new compute platform. It wasn't long afterward that our Cloud Ambassador, Greg Ness, joined FiRe panel members along with others, including SNS member Vint Cerf, to form the Infrastructure 2.0 Working Group, to repair some hidden security and operating flaws in the nexus between enterprise networks and data center platforms. Today, everyone is talking cloud computing, but the issue of security continues to drive the conversation around corporate adoption. While it is obvious that startups have terrific benefit in public cloud use through scalability, it is equally obvious that Fortune 500 firms are not putting their crown jewels into someone else's hands.The result: the current public/private hybrid cloud, again offered early to our members at FiRe, and now omnipresent as the preferred cloud option.Clearly, in all of this history, security is front and center. For that reason alone, I believe our members will find this week's Special Letter to be of direct use. - mra.


    Share this: Share on Facebook Tweet about this on Twitter Share on Google+ Share on LinkedIn Email this to someone
  • SNS: Special Letter: Big Data Strategy and Insights

    October 10, 2013

    Volume 16, Issue 36
    Week of October 7, 2013
    In This Issue
    Feature: Special Letter: Big Data Strategy and Insights
    • About John Hagel III
    • About Eric Openshaw
    • See More

    ---

    "Increased Fragmentation and Concentration Caused by Massive Increases in Data" and "The Economic Activity and Institutional Effects of Massive Increases in Data"

    A Conversation with: John Hagel III, Director and Co-Chair, Deloitte Center for the Edge; and Eric Openshaw, Vice Chairman and US Technology, Media and Telecommunications Leader, Deloitte LLP

    Hosted by Ed Butler, Senior Broadcast Journalist, BBC

    Wednesday, May 22, 2013
    Montage Resort
    Laguna Beach, California


    Share this: Share on Facebook Tweet about this on Twitter Share on Google+ Share on LinkedIn Email this to someone
  • SNS: The Mobile Global Computer

    October 2, 2013

    Volume 16, Issue 35
    Week of September 30, 2013
    In This Issue
    Feature: The Mobile Global Computer
    • The Global Computer
    • The Malware Path: The First Mobile Botnet Trojan
    • For Good or Ill?
    • Data-Driven Programming

    Quotes of the Week
    Takeout Window
    • - The Android Botnet Strikes
    • - Number of Smartphones Sold in Q2, by Vendor
    • - Number of Smartphones Sold in Q2, by OS
    • - Tipping Point in Smartphone vs. Feature Phones
    • - Total Number of Mobile Phones Sold in Q2
    • - Features in the Installed Base of Mobile Phones
    • - Number of Cars Produced in 2011
    • - LTE Adoption Growth Rate

    In Case You Missed It...
    Members Making News
    ---

    We have just built the world's most powerful computer, but no one has used it yet. What is even more amazing: no one even knows it exists.A Google search on this week's title' issues zero results - other than misplaced shopping carts and retail sites. Now that we have published, that should change.


    Share this: Share on Facebook Tweet about this on Twitter Share on Google+ Share on LinkedIn Email this to someone
  • SNS: Special Letter: Solving the IP Crisis and Enabling Global Economic Growth

    September 11, 2013

    Volume 16, Issue 32
    Week of September 9, 2013
    In This Issue
    Feature: Special Letter: Solving the IP Crisis and Enabling Global Economic Growth
    • The Scale and Scope of Loss
    • Geographic Findings
    • Policy Recommendations
    • What's Next, What's Needed?
    • About the IP Commission
    • About Rich Ellings

    ---

    Publisher's Note: SNS members are well aware of the alarms we have raised over the last six years or so regarding what we now call Infomercantilism: national business models fueled by the theft of other nations' crown jewel intellectual property.At SNS, the result has been the creation of the INVNT/IP (Inventing Nations vs. Nation-sponsored Theft of IP) Global Consortium and Global Network (www.invntip.com). Today, that group includes many of the leading international technology firms, working with Cabinet-level leaders from Australia, the US, and the EU.In pursuing INVNT/IP's goals, I was recently at the Aspen Security Forum, where I met with the Hon. Dennis Blair, past director of National Intelligence. Admiral Blair is the co-chair, with Gov. Jon Huntsman, of the Commission on the Theft of American Intellectual Property, known as the IP Commission.

    Perhaps aside from (or including) the work we have done at SNS, the IP Commission's recently published report is the best and most detailed description to date of the economic damages resulting from this problem set. I offered Admiral Blair our assistance in getting more attention and support for the Commission Report, knowing that the more global leaders who read it, the better our chances of achieving a successful resolution.Denny was kind enough to introduce me to Rich Ellings, president of the National Bureau of Asian Research, which published the report, and program director for the IP Commission. Rich agreed to write this Special Letter condensing the group's understanding of the problem and some paths for solving it.

    I think this issue, and the IP Commission Report behind it, should be required reading for every CEO whose company depends upon technological advance.To my mind, that's every CEO in the world. - mra.


    Share this: Share on Facebook Tweet about this on Twitter Share on Google+ Share on LinkedIn Email this to someone
  • SNS: The Next Assistant

    August 22, 2013

    Volume 16, Issue 30
    Week of August 19, 2013
    In This Issue
    Feature: The Next Assistant
    • It Isn't Easy
    • Getting It Right
    • Business Issues

    Quotes of the Week
    Upgrades
    • Cisco's Arc

    Takeout Window
    • Tesla Grabs Highest Safety Score Ever

    In Case You Missed It...
    Members Making News
    ---

    There haven't been' that many times in technology history when so many fates have depended on a single software application.What if it turned out that the fates of Apple Computer, Nokia, the country of Finland, Microsoft Corp., Google (to some degree), Nuance, and many other firms were all linked through the success or failure of their work in one category? As far as I can tell, it is.Welcome to the next virtual assistant, or what SNS members would call Internet Assistant III. What is IA III, and why is it/he/she different from past versions?


    Share this: Share on Facebook Tweet about this on Twitter Share on Google+ Share on LinkedIn Email this to someone
  • SNS: Special Letter: All Your Data is Being Stolen as You Read This

    August 15, 2013

    Volume 16, Issue 29
    Week of August 12, 2013
    SNS: Special Letter: All Your Data is Being Stolen as You Read This
    • A Bit of Background
    • Network vs. Apps
    • Expressed Concerns
    • A Bit of Tech Talk
    • Where Do We Go from Here?
    • About Kevin Surace

    ---

    Publisher's Note: Something interesting has been happening in the world of cyber attacks, and very few outside the security establishment have noticed it yet although it involves everyone reading this Special Letter.Not long ago, security officials reported that hackers working for the Iranian government had mounted a series of extensive DDoS (distributed denial of service) attacks on Western banks. The motivation seemed clear: a response to sanctions against Iran over its ongoing nuclear program; and the results, to the public at least, predictable: a hassle.DDoS attacks, after all, were historically considered the sledge hammer in a mostly surgical hacker toolset. Using botnets to array hundreds, or thousands, of servers to send simultaneous requests to a single Web server usually had the intended function: it overwhelmed the server, or at least made it difficult-to-impossible for the victim companys customers to access its services online. As time progressed, companies have found increasingly better ways to deal with these problems, and while they remain a threat, they have dropped down the ladder of worry. But that was then.

    Since around the time of the Iranian attacks, a new concern has emerged among those who make a living studying cyber crime and espionage: What if DDoS attacks are just a part of larger attacks? Today, one level of the state of the art in cyber offense is to use DDoSs as both a distraction and a way of softening a targets defenses, so that while the victim company is busy dealing with the massive onslaught of fake Web requests, one or more additional teams are working on breaking into the company's network and stealing secrets.

    Indeed, such multisource attacks are now becoming common, and the use of DDoSs as just one of the tools in a single attack is no longer in doubt as a technique. As if that were not enough to worry about, DDoSs have another benefit to offer would-be cyber attackers: they can put so much stress on the applications layer that integrity is compromised and new entry points for the bad guys magically appear.

    In this weeks Special Letter, longtime member and serial Valley entrepreneur Kevin Surace describes this problem in clear detail and offers a much-needed new solution set. The good news: that software you bought that beefs up firewalls and known virus attacks is doing pretty well on those. The bad news: the new attacks will go right around your defenses. As I write, our INVNT/IP site specifically focused on stopping nation-sponsored theft of IP, including by cyber theft has been under DDoS attack for 24 hours. Thanks to prudent planning, there isn't any private data there to be stolen. And we were careful as we began this work to set this server up separate from all our other servers, physically and technically.

    Thanks to our terrific CTO, the site has not gone down or been inaccessible to our users since the onslaught began. But thanks to Kevin Surace, we're now aware that the real attack may be happening on a different level.

    I know that our members will want to learn about, understand, and be prepared for this new type of attack before it comes to them. -mra


    Share this: Share on Facebook Tweet about this on Twitter Share on Google+ Share on LinkedIn Email this to someone
  • SNS: The Big Shift

    August 8, 2013

    Volume 16, Issue 28
    Week of August 5, 2013
    In This Issue
    Feature: The Big Shift
    Quotes of the Week
    Upgrades
    • Abenomics Deconstructed
    • German Pols vs. German Business: Chinese Solar Panel Dumping Rewarded

    Takeout Window
    • Top 5 Smartphone Vendors by Volume
    • The Inventing World's New Billboard?

    In Case You Missed It...
    Members Making News
    ---

    I ran into Todd Bradley from Hewlett-Packard at Brainstorm last week. He, perhaps alone among the many participants, had the hardest time coming up with a business card. This is understandable: Todd has just been reassigned from running what had been the world's largest PC operation to trying to fix things in China. The words "daunting" and "fraught" come to mind...

    ...Is it possible that we are not running out of great inventors, but rather, the business models to enable them?


    Share this: Share on Facebook Tweet about this on Twitter Share on Google+ Share on LinkedIn Email this to someone
  • SNS: “Safety on the Net”: A Centerpiece Conversation with Vint Cerf

    July 24, 2013

    Volume 16, Issue 26
    Week of July 22, 2013
    In This Issue
    Feature: "Safety on the Net": A Centerpiece Conversation with Vint Cerf
    • Vint Cerf: SNS & External Links
    • About Vint Cerf
    • About Larry Smarr

    ---

    Introduction and Publisher's Note:It seems that not a week goes by without Vint Cerf, Google's Chief Evangelist and the "Father of the Internet," receiving yet another prize, award, or accolade. We were lucky enough this year that Vint made the time to join us for a conversation onstage with his longtime friend Larry Smarr, himself one of the technology heroes of the age. The result is one of the most fascinating and enjoyable renditions of a cross between technology history and anecdotes, and a deep engineering-driven understanding of today's security vs. privacy issues on the Net. I have no doubt that our members will delight in their exchange of ideas, inventions, and the inside story on what we now call the Net. -mra.


    Share this: Share on Facebook Tweet about this on Twitter Share on Google+ Share on LinkedIn Email this to someone
  • SNS: Redesigning Television: Part II

    July 16, 2013

    Volume 16, Issue 25
    Week of July 15, 2013
    In This Issue
    Feature: Redesigning Television: Part II
    • It's All About the Net
    • The Solution Sets
    • The Big Screen
    • E-Commerce
    • Content
    • Screens and Guides
    • Communications
    • The Data Stream
    • Summary

    Quotes of the Week
    Upgrades
    • The Android Master Key Bug

    Takeout Window
    • The Advertiser's Dream TV

    In Case You Missed It...
    Members Making News---

    In Part I of this two-part series, we looked at the current television landscape: who views, using what devices; who pays for advertising, in what sectors; what today's hardware and software offerings are; how much money is involved in the industry; where the fast learning is going on in networks and local stations; how the vertical e-commerce companies are playing; and more (see "SNS: Redesigning Television: Part I"). This week, we'll look forward five years or so and try to understand what to expect in the complex, transitional ecosystem of TV.


    Share this: Share on Facebook Tweet about this on Twitter Share on Google+ Share on LinkedIn Email this to someone
  • SNS: Redesigning Television: Part I

    July 12, 2013

    Volume 16, Issue 24
    Week of July 8, 2013
    In This Issue
    Feature: Redesigning Television: Part I
    • The TV Ecosystem Today
    • Networks vs. Local Stations
    • The Hardware, and the Little Boxes
    • Content Is King
    • The Software

    Quotes of the Week
    Upgrades
    • Gene Patents

    Takeout Window
    • The New TV Hardware

    Ethermail
    In Case You Missed It...
    Members Making News
    ---

    Although it isn't only about money, it really is all about the money. So let's start with the big number: last year, in the US alone, vendors spent $74B on television advertising.

    OK, we got that out of the way. Television is in the middle of a revolution. But given this undeniable fact, it is remarkable how little television has changed in the last few decades. Even when the world's most amazing change artists - Steve Jobs, for instance, or Google, or Amazon - have taken a run at this issue, not much has changed.

    This is unusual, if not amazing. And yet everyone, literally, believes that TV is undergoing the most radical revolution it has ever experienced. Is it? If so, we haven't yet seen the result.


    Share this: Share on Facebook Tweet about this on Twitter Share on Google+ Share on LinkedIn Email this to someone
  • SNS: Zero Loss: The Fire CxO IP Checklist

    July 4, 2013

    Volume 16, Issue 23
    Week of July 1, 2013
    In This Issue
    Feature: Zero Loss: The Fire CxO IP Checklist
    • Is Knowledge Enough?
    • Barriers to Success
    • The FiRe CTO Challenge

    Quotes of the Week
    Upgrades
    • Apple's Ads

    Takeout Window
    • The FiRe CTO Design Challenge: Zero Loss - A CxO Checklist
    • The Government Agency View

    In Case You Missed It...
    Members Making News
    ---

    For corporate executives, security is no longer a security issue; it's an economic imperative. The theft of their secrets can destroy their flagship product line, their company, or even their whole economic sector. How can a CEO, CIO, CSO, or CTO do his fiduciary duty of protecting crown jewel intellectual property? Obviously, these executives are now responding to the proven threat by investing in more secure systems, right? Not so fast.


    Share this: Share on Facebook Tweet about this on Twitter Share on Google+ Share on LinkedIn Email this to someone
  • Safety on the Net: Authentication, Pseudonymity, and Resilience vs. Increasing Threats

    May 23, 2013

    "Safety on the Net: Authentication, Pseudonymity, and Resilience vs. Increasing Threats": A Centerpiece Conversation with Vint Cerf, Chief Evangelist, Google; hosted by Larry Smarr, Director, Calit2 and Qualcomm Institute, UCSD and Irvine


    Share this: Share on Facebook Tweet about this on Twitter Share on Google+ Share on LinkedIn Email this to someone
  • Taking Voice Digitization Beyond Words

    May 23, 2013

    "Taking Voice Digitization Beyond Words": A conversation with Peter Mahoney, CMO, Nuance Communications; Cary Bran, Senior Director, Innovation and New Ventures, Plantronics; and Kirsten Bay, President and CEO, Attensity Group; hosted by Stephen Socolof, Managing Partner, New Venture Partners


    Share this: Share on Facebook Tweet about this on Twitter Share on Google+ Share on LinkedIn Email this to someone
  • The Chips to Power the Next Digital Planet

    May 23, 2013

    Centerpiece Conversation: "The Chips to Power the Next Digital Planet" - With Tom Lantzsch, Executive Vice President of Strategy, ARM Inc.; hosted by Robert F. Anderson, Director, Technology Transfer and Intellectual Property, Illinois Institute of Technology


    Share this: Share on Facebook Tweet about this on Twitter Share on Google+ Share on LinkedIn Email this to someone
  • Centerpiece Conversation: Mark Hurd, President, Oracle

    May 22, 2013

    Centerpiece Conversation: Mark Hurd, President, Oracle; hosted by Mark Anderson.


    Share this: Share on Facebook Tweet about this on Twitter Share on Google+ Share on LinkedIn Email this to someone
  • In the Wake of the Mandiant Report: China IP Theft and the World Economy

    May 22, 2013

    "In the Wake of the Mandiant Report: China IP Theft and the World Economy": A conversation with Richard Marshall, CEO, X-SES; and Mark Anderson, Founder and Chair, INVNT/IP; hosted by Ed Butler, Senior Broadcast Journalist, BBC


    Share this: Share on Facebook Tweet about this on Twitter Share on Google+ Share on LinkedIn Email this to someone
  • SNS: When Windows Tanks

    May 2, 2013

    Volume 16, Issue 16
    Week of April 29, 2013
    In This Issue
    Feature: When Windows Tanks
    • Why Microsoft Is Right, and Why Windows 8 Is Wrong
    • Bill's Strategy at the Old Microsoft
    • Are PCs Dying?
    • What Happens to Microsoft?
    • What Happens to the Industry?
    • From a Higher Vantage Point

    Quotes of the Week
    Upgrades
    • "Google Now" Takes On Siri
    • Intel's New Leaders

    Takeout Window
    • Desktop OS Marketing Share
    • Microsoft Stock Performance
    • "Google Now" Comes to the iPhone and iPad: Look Out, Siri
    • The Microsoft Surface RT
    • Rupert's Intellectual Damage

    Ethermail
    ---

    I recently found myself asking fellow panelists at an MIT Forum what would happen if Windows 8 just didn't take off. There was a conversational pause, so I asked again. No takers. Perhaps it was because we were in Seattle, but no one wanted to talk about the elephant in the room.

    It's quite likely that Windows 8 will be a bomb. If no one buys it, then what? What will happen to Microsoft, and what will happen to the rest of the computer industry? This seems to me to be a critical strategic issue facing everyone involved. While there are currently online arguments about the level of sales, and why they are falling short, I haven't seen the larger, much more important question raised regarding what happens if the whole thing just tanks.


    Share this: Share on Facebook Tweet about this on Twitter Share on Google+ Share on LinkedIn Email this to someone
  • SNS: Special Letter: Mobile Voice and Natural Language Understanding: Revolution or Evolution?

    April 24, 2013

    Volume 16, Issue 15
    Week of April 22, 2013
    In This Issue
    Feature: Mobile Voice and Natural Language Understanding
    • The Catalysts for Voice
    • Measuring How Far Voice Recognition Has Come
    • The Year of the Natural Language Understanding Application
    • Smarter NLU... or AI?
    • NLU Means Direct Access
    • How Do We Want to Talk to Our Devices?
    • A Network of Services - and Devices
    • Mobile Devices Becoming More Aware
    • The Car: Just Another Mobile Device?
    • Voice in the Livingroom
    • The Transformation of Customer Care
    • Mobile Voice and NLU in Healthcare
    • So... Is It a Revolution or an Evolution?
    • About the Author

    ----

    Publisher's Note: If there is one technology in the world which would seem to hold the key to liberating the human-compute connection, it is voice recognition; and if there is one person in the world who knows most about this link, it is likely Vlad Sejnoha, CTO at Nuance. Most of us have spent a lifetime waiting for this technology to reach maturity, but Vlad is a star in the world of those who have made it happen.

    But as SNS members will see from our issue this week, Vlad's interest in this technology goes far beyond VR and into what we have started calling "meta biometrics." I doubt that there is a major technology provider today that is not interested in getting this into its products in one way or another, nor is there a major consumer or enterprise company that is not on the hunt for how this can be used to improve its own customer relations - and profits.

    As Vlad's efforts lead to ever-greater understanding of man-machine communications, and of the information content in our own voices, the value of this work climbs exponentially. - mra.


    Share this: Share on Facebook Tweet about this on Twitter Share on Google+ Share on LinkedIn Email this to someone
  • SNS: Platform Wars: Who Wins

    April 19, 2013

    Volume 16, Issue 14
    Week of April 15, 2013
    In This Issue
    Feature: Platform Wars: Who Wins
    • Follow the Business Model
    • Countries vs. Companies
    • E-Commerce: The Sing Sing Model
    • Smartphones
    • The Long-Term Question

    Quotes Of The Week
    Upgrades
    • Intel Numbers
    • Saving Apple

    Takeout Window
    • Platform War Visuals

    In Case You Missed It...
    Members Making News
    ---

    Last week I had the opportunity of speaking on a panel for the MIT Enterprise Forum of the Northwest on the subject of "platform wars." Our task was to pick winners from among "Microsoft vs. Google (Samsung) vs. Apple vs. Amazon vs. Facebook" and any others on the horizon. My fellow discussants were Al Hilwa, program director at IDC, and Steve Tapia, senior corporate counsel at DIREC TV Sports Networks.

    MIT asked me to do an interview before the event as a preview of my thoughts; it can be found here:<www.mitwa.org/events/enterprise-forum-program/platform-wars-coming-tech-wreck-seattle>

    Since the media is already full of the importance and debate over this Gladiator Wars-like question, I will skip most of the run-up and debate which I consider spurious to the outcomes. In fact, I'll start by stating the only real issue that I think matters for those investors, employees, software developers, customers, and product people trying to make smart bets: Follow the business models.


    Share this: Share on Facebook Tweet about this on Twitter Share on Google+ Share on LinkedIn Email this to someone
  • SNS: Six Smartphone Killer Apps

    April 4, 2013

    Volume 16, Issue 13
    Week of April 1, 2013
    In This Issue
    Feature: Six Smartphone Killer Apps
    • Wireless Micro Maps
    • The Self-Contained Locator
    • Mesh Networks
    • The Quantified Self
    • The Internet Assistant III: Meta Biometrics
    • Food Knowledge

    Quotes of the Week
    Upgrades
    • The Real Problem with North Korea
    • Another Invisible-Cloak Breakthrough

    Takeout Window
    • Smartphone Night Goggles?
    • Graphene Loudspeakers, Earphones, Microphones

    Ethermail
    In Case You Missed It...
    Members Making News
    ---

    Last week I made the case that the smartphone OS was the (pre-global warming) waterfront real estate of the technology asset business. Students of technology history already know that: a) platform winners at the small-format end of the ladder almost always climb up to larger, more expensive platforms (witness the Surface on W8, Android pads, PC OS's devouring minicomputers, etc.); and b) those who control the OS generally control the applications ecosystem.

    When I first created the concept of Hyperstructural Economics, I based it on the personal-computer ecosystem of the time. From our new website's "Insights and Analysis" area (www.stratnews.com/innovations/), we have this definition: A theory using strategic product component design and related supply chains to reveal corporate alliances and to predict economic outcomes in global technology markets. In other words, the product's (in today's case, the smartphone) technical structure dictates the economic outcome of those in the supply chain, starting with the inner keiretsu of cooperating allies. (Foxconn is currently proving this theory, thanks to its role supplying Apple, while Wall Street does its best to ferret out, and short, the other iPhone suppliers.) These principles continue to provide the best illumination for understanding the technology economy. But every rule set has an exception, and this one is no exception: Killer apps.


    Share this: Share on Facebook Tweet about this on Twitter Share on Google+ Share on LinkedIn Email this to someone
  • SNS: What Mandiant Brings

    March 7, 2013

    Volume 16, Issue 9
    Week of March 4, 2013
    In This Issue
    Feature: What Mandiant Brings
    • Basic Discoveries and Announcements
    • China: Not Just Another Global Player
    • China's National Policy of IP Theft
    • A Brief History of Chinese IP Theft Practices
    • The Tsunami Question
    • What Has Changed: Then vs. Now
    • INVNT/IP and Coordinated Action

    Quotes of the Week
    Upgrades
    • Hitachi/Western Digital Goes Nano
    • Currency Wars III

    Takeout Window
    • Mandiant Proves China's Role in Nation-Sponsored IP Theft

    Ethermail
    In Case You Missed It...
    Members Making News
    ---

    Last week, while our team was meeting with the top intelligence and cyber officials of the UK, the Mandiant Corporation released a report that changed the global balance of power, and, hopefully, the future of the global economy. Needless to say, it was on top of mind for everyone in the intelligence world, and, by all reports, had the same effect on the crowds at the annual RSA Conference in San Francisco.


    Share this: Share on Facebook Tweet about this on Twitter Share on Google+ Share on LinkedIn Email this to someone
  • SNS: Special Letter: Disrupting Markets With Big Data And Collective Impact

    February 28, 2013

    Volume 16, Issue 8
    Week of February 25, 2013
    In This Issue
    Feature: Special Letter: Disrupting Markets With Big Data And Collective Impact
    • From Ants to Sociology
    • Enter "Big Data"
    • Expectations Transference for Consumers
    • Trust and Identity Management
    • The New Political Reality
    • Eliminating Waste
    • More than GDP: Rotation Matters
    • What to Do?
    • Related Links
    • About the Author

    ---

    Publisher's Note: Everyone has heard the Big Data drumbeat this year, from the halls of the Mobile World Congress in Barcelona to EMC's incessant marketing machine. It started a few years ago as the industry's coinage for the Next Big Thing, as all the major players were gearing up their server and storage offerings. Then it moved into its own reality, as we shifted from decades of Data Analytics into the true religion of planet-loads of unstructured data, and the true (or sometimes imagined) benefits of what we can obtain from processing all of it. Today, as we build out a digitized planet in every sense (the theme of this year's FiRe Conference), the amount of data, and potential knowledge, available to humans is staggering - and easily far beyond our ability to comprehend its meaning, or what actions may be required.

    Whether we are adding data-center layers in order to facilitate the conversion from raw data to information or searching for a revolutionary new interface to help us make sense of the results, it is obvious that we are in need of new approaches to data processing to make this all make sense, justify the cost, and bring our understanding to a new level. Thankfully, Jay Leon, a longtime member and CEO with a deep understanding of distribution, has brought us a view of those next steps. I found it fascinating and new, and I think all of you will as well. - mra


    Share this: Share on Facebook Tweet about this on Twitter Share on Google+ Share on LinkedIn Email this to someone
  • SNS: International Challenges to Innovation Protection

    February 20, 2013

    Volume 16, Issue 7
    Week of February 18, 2013
    In This Issue
    Feature: "International Challenges to Innovation Protection"
    A Conversation with Sir Richard Dearlove
    In Case You Missed It...
    Members Making News
    ---

    Introduction and Publisher's Note: This week, Mandiant Corp., a well-respected security firm with a long history in defense-related work, announced that it had integrated the information of "hundreds of investigations" to allow a positive attribution regarding the Chinese People's Liberation Army attacking commercial and government cyber targets in the US and UK. This was the first provable, public announcement of something we've been sharing with SNS members for many years now.

    I expect that the effects of Mandiant's work and announcement will be pivotal in bringing CEOs to a new level of acceptance that their country, and their companies, are under constant and direct attack by military-grade teams. The goals of these state-sponsored teams is to obtain corporate Intellectual Property and sell it at subsidized prices in global markets in direct competition with the inventing companies and nations.

    Last December 6, we were honored to have Sir Richard Dearlove join us for our Annual Predictions Dinner at the Waldorf Astoria Hotel. Sir Richard is best known for his years of service as the chief of the British SIS, also known as MI6. He is well-versed in the history and tactics of China's many and ongoing attempts to steal Western trade secrets and related IP.

    I believe that everyone needs to hear Sir Richard's thoughts and cautionary comments on this subject, and the recent Mandiant announcements simply underline the importance that every corporation now take real steps to stop this unbelievable and unsustainable level of IP loss. - mra


    Share this: Share on Facebook Tweet about this on Twitter Share on Google+ Share on LinkedIn Email this to someone
  • SNS: The Most Important Chip Not Yet Invented

    February 14, 2013

    Volume 16, Issue 6
    Week of February 11, 2013
    In This Issue
    Feature: The Most Important Chip Not Yet Invented
    • Reducing the Instruction Set
    • PRPs
    • The Importance of Patterns
    • Be the Pattern
    • Evolved Clues
    • Find the Element
    • Patterns in Space
    • Patterns in Time
    • Complexity

    Quotes of the Week
    Upgrades
    • Lenovo Put SNS' "Wall Computing" on the Table

    Takeout Window
    • A Prototypical Digital Signal Processor Chip
    • Solar Canals: Implementing a FiRe CTO Design Challenge

    Ethermail
    In Case You Missed It...
    Members Making News---

    Reducing the Instruction Set

    Imagine a blank touchscreen. You draw an irregular line across it, from edge to edge. Then you turn over the 5-minute sand clock next to you. Your life depends upon finding the area under that line.Now let's say you are a Ph.D. in advanced mathematics. Obviously, you are going to apply some form of calculus to describe each portion of this constantly changing curve, set various rectangular artificial box boundaries with finite known areas below it, and then calculate the remaining areas in ever-smaller increments, depending on the computing power and time at your disposal.

    Or, you could do finite-element analysis, or try to fit Fast Fourier transforms into the shape of the line on ever-smaller sections, or find one of a thousand other clever ways to solve this problem. In each case, you would be able to use a computer for assistance, which helps. You could program the computer to look at the line from the aspects described above, turning it into finite elements of varying lengths, each with its own straight-line tangential slope approximation. Or you could run other programs to fit your other ideas.In virtually every instance, however, the computer would need to use sensors - and probably some form of analog/digital converter, most likely a digital signal processor (DSP) chip in the middle - perhaps then reconvert the answer into analog, and format appropriate outputs, while doing all of the serious math in the digital domain, for every data point. So, add a bit of latency here per each calculation. Not much sand left. Or (aha!) you could just ---


    Share this: Share on Facebook Tweet about this on Twitter Share on Google+ Share on LinkedIn Email this to someone
  • SNS: The Geographical Fate of Personal Computers

    January 23, 2013

    Volume 16, Issue 3
    Week of January 21, 2013
    In This Issue
    Feature: The Geographical Fate of Personal Computers
    • The Inventors
    • The Followers
    • The Countries
    • The Markets
    • The Slowing US Engines
    • The OEM/ODM Mistake
    • Destructive Destructionism

    Quotes of The Week
    Upgrades
    • Mercantilist M&A: Running by China Rules

    Takeout Window
    • Dilbert vs. Microsoft
    • Google's Answer to Passwords
    • Politics Over Banking: Currency Wars II

    Ethermail
    In Case You Missed It...
    Members Making News


    Share this: Share on Facebook Tweet about this on Twitter Share on Google+ Share on LinkedIn Email this to someone
  • “Production vs. Consumption: Computer Sales Explode!”

    September 14, 2012

    SNS Weekly Report on the success of Computer Sales in the world market today.


    Share this: Share on Facebook Tweet about this on Twitter Share on Google+ Share on LinkedIn Email this to someone
  • “Wall Computing Has Arrived”

    July 31, 2012

    Mark tells KPLU’s Dave Meyer that Wall Computing is becoming a reality, heralded in part by Microsoft’s recent acquisition of Perceptive Pixel, which makes large, multi-touch computer displays.


    Share this: Share on Facebook Tweet about this on Twitter Share on Google+ Share on LinkedIn Email this to someone
  • “Integrating Robots into Our Homes, Healthcare, and Beyond”

    May 24, 2012

    A conversation with Colin Angle, CEO and Co-Founder, iRobot; hosted by Patrick Lane, Technology Correspondent, The Economist


    Share this: Share on Facebook Tweet about this on Twitter Share on Google+ Share on LinkedIn Email this to someone
  • “The Future Integration of Critical Technologies into the Connected Car”

    May 24, 2012

    A Conversation with Ben Smith, Director of Program Management, Windows Embedded, Microsoft; Gary Clayton, Chief Creative Officer, Nuance Communications; and Sheryl Connelly, Global Trends and Futuring Manager, Ford Motor; hosted by Matthias Hohensee, Bureau Chief Silicon Valley and Columnist, WirtschaftsWoche


    Share this: Share on Facebook Tweet about this on Twitter Share on Google+ Share on LinkedIn Email this to someone
  • “What Every CIO Should Know About Cloud Computing”

    May 24, 2012

    With James Barrese, CTO, PayPal; Winston Damarillo, Co-Founder and CEO, Morphlabs; David Nelson, Chief Strategist, Cloud Computing, Boeing; Don Pickering, CEO, OneOcean; and Paul Strong, CTO, Global Field & Customer Initiatives, VMware; hosted by Greg Ness, Chief Marketing Officer, Vantage Data Centers


    Share this: Share on Facebook Tweet about this on Twitter Share on Google+ Share on LinkedIn Email this to someone
  • “The Future of Information Security”

    May 23, 2012

    A conversation with Gus Hunt, CTO, Central Intelligence Agency; hosted by Robert Anderson, Director, Technology Transfer and Intellectual Property, Illinois Institute of Technology


    Share this: Share on Facebook Tweet about this on Twitter Share on Google+ Share on LinkedIn Email this to someone
  • “The Future of Mobile Computing: Integrated Features and Services Five Years from Now”

    May 23, 2012

    With Henry Tirri, EVP and CTO, Nokia; and James Barrese, CTO, PayPal; hosted by Chetan Sharma, President, Chetan Sharma Consulting


    Share this: Share on Facebook Tweet about this on Twitter Share on Google+ Share on LinkedIn Email this to someone
  • “The Future of Wireless”

    May 23, 2012

    A Centerpiece Conversation with Irwin Jacobs, Co-Founder, past CEO, and Board Member; and Paul Jacobs, Chair and CEO, Qualcomm; hosted by Mark Anderson


    Share this: Share on Facebook Tweet about this on Twitter Share on Google+ Share on LinkedIn Email this to someone
  • The New Frontier: Simplify IT

    May 23, 2012

    A Centerpiece Conversation with Mark Hurd, President, Oracle; hosted by Mark Anderson


    Share this: Share on Facebook Tweet about this on Twitter Share on Google+ Share on LinkedIn Email this to someone
  • “Extending Moore’s Law: Electronics to Photonics”

    July 13, 2011

    An SNS Special Letter, written by guest author Michael Hochberg


    Share this: Share on Facebook Tweet about this on Twitter Share on Google+ Share on LinkedIn Email this to someone
  • “Solving the Greatest Enterprise Security Threat”

    July 7, 2011

    An SNS Special Letter, written by guest author Stephen Sprague


    Share this: Share on Facebook Tweet about this on Twitter Share on Google+ Share on LinkedIn Email this to someone
  • “Embedded Vision: Computers Seeing You”

    May 25, 2011

    A Conversation with Bruce Kleinman, Corporate VP, Platform Marketing, Xilinx; Marc Tremblay, Distinguished Engineer, Microsoft; and Ian Weightman, President, IMS Research; hosted by Scott Gardner, General Manager and EIC, Embedded Vision Alliance


    Share this: Share on Facebook Tweet about this on Twitter Share on Google+ Share on LinkedIn Email this to someone
  • “IPTV and the World of Streaming 4G Devices”

    May 25, 2011

    With David Garrison, CEO, iBAHN; and Philip Nelson, SVP Strategic Development, NewTek; hosted by Jim Louderback, CEO, Revision3


    Share this: Share on Facebook Tweet about this on Twitter Share on Google+ Share on LinkedIn Email this to someone
  • “The Future of Car Computing”

    May 25, 2011

    A conversation with Paul Mascarenas, CTO, Ford Motor Co.; hosted by Mark Anderson


    Share this: Share on Facebook Tweet about this on Twitter Share on Google+ Share on LinkedIn Email this to someone
  • “The Future of Chipped Intelligence”

    May 25, 2011

    A conversation with Justin Rattner, CTO and Senior Fellow; and VP & Director, Intel Labs, Intel Corp; hosted by Mark Anderson


    Share this: Share on Facebook Tweet about this on Twitter Share on Google+ Share on LinkedIn Email this to someone
  • Keynote Conversation: Paul Ricci, Chair and CEO, Nuance Corp.

    May 25, 2011

    hosted by Russ Daggatt, General Partner, Denny Hill Capital


    Share this: Share on Facebook Tweet about this on Twitter Share on Google+ Share on LinkedIn Email this to someone
  • “The Future of High-Performance Computing”

    November 11, 2010

    A Centerpiece Conversation with Mark Hurd, President, Oracle


    Share this: Share on Facebook Tweet about this on Twitter Share on Google+ Share on LinkedIn Email this to someone
  • “Why the Memristor Will Change the Future of Electronics”

    November 11, 2010

    With Janice Nickel, Senior Scientist, HP Labs


    Share this: Share on Facebook Tweet about this on Twitter Share on Google+ Share on LinkedIn Email this to someone
  • “Fixing the Cloud: Business Models and Infrastructure”

    November 11, 2010

    A discussion with with Brian Bershad, Director of Research and Development, Google; Chris Drumgoole, Senior Vice President, Terremark; Doug Gourlay, VP Marketing, Arista Networks; Yousef Khalidi, Distinguished Engineer, Microsoft; Matt McIlwain, Managing Director, Madrona Ventures; and Javier Soltero, CTO, VMware; hosted by Gregory Ness


    Share this: Share on Facebook Tweet about this on Twitter Share on Google+ Share on LinkedIn Email this to someone
  • “The Complex World of Emerging Platforms, from Cloud to Phone”

    May 12, 2010

    A Centerpiece Conversation with Ray Ozzie, Chief Software Architect and CTO, Microsoft; hosted by Mark Anderson


    Share this: Share on Facebook Tweet about this on Twitter Share on Google+ Share on LinkedIn Email this to someone
  • “The Future of Printing and Imaging”

    May 23, 2007

    A conversation with Vyomesh Joshi, EVP, Imaging and Printing Group, Hewlett-Packard; hosted by Mark Anderson


    Share this: Share on Facebook Tweet about this on Twitter Share on Google+ Share on LinkedIn Email this to someone
  • “Centerpiece Conversation with Michael Dell”

    May 15, 2006

    A Centerpiece Conversation with Michael Dell, Chairman, Dell Inc.; hosted by Mark Anderson


    Share this: Share on Facebook Tweet about this on Twitter Share on Google+ Share on LinkedIn Email this to someone
  • “Using Supercomputers and Supervisualization Techniques”

    May 15, 2006

    A conversation with Larry Smarr, Director, California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology, and Harry E. Gruber Professor, Department of Computer Science and Engineering, UC San Diego; hosted by John K. Thompson, CEO, Marketing Sciences


    Share this: Share on Facebook Tweet about this on Twitter Share on Google+ Share on LinkedIn Email this to someone

Channel Partner

Leaders in This Focus Channel

More Thought Leaders

iNews

  • Nvidia: Decline In Cryptocurrency Revenue Threatens Share Price

    Thu, 21 Sep 2017 02:04:00 -0700

    In turn, this decline in income and profitability may be expected to prompt a fall in share price. Nvidia CEO Jen-Hsun Huang stated at the time of Nvidia's most recent earnings call that cryptocurrency is "a very important market." The company produces ...

  • SFI Investigators Programme announces research investment of €43 million

    Thu, 21 Sep 2017 01:26:00 -0700

    These projects are on a reserve list to be supported if budgets permit later in the year. Professor Mark Ferguson, Director General of Science Foundation Ireland and Chief Scientific Adviser to the Government of Ireland added, “The Science Foundation ...

  • BlueJeans Announces Innovative, User-friendly Workflow Solutions to Make Vide...

    Thu, 14 Sep 2017 02:39:00 -0700

    “Streaming our all hands meetings directly into Workplace has been great,” said Karen Possemato, Vice President, Corporate Marketing and Communications at Illumina. “It’s easier for our employees to access content by providing a central place for ...

  • The Fire Next Time – Our Environmental Future

    Wed, 13 Sep 2017 08:15:00 -0700

    Glen Hiemstra is the founder and owner of Futurist.com. An internationally respected expert on future trends, long-range planning and creating the preferred future, Glen has advised professional, business, and governmental organizations for two decades.

More iNews from SNS