Pure Science

Pure Science

The SNS Pure Science channel focuses on research by members of the SNS community into pure science, including physics, climatology, space and ocean exploration, evolutionary theory, ethnology, and more.

 

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Topics in This Focus Channel

  • Quantum Computing: Targeting Quantum Chemistry with a New Qubit Chip and New Algorithms

    September 29, 2016

    With Jonathan Carter, Deputy Director of Computing Sciences, Lawrence Berkeley National Lab; hosted by Brett Horvath, Co-Founder and Head of Product, Scout


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  • The Oldest and Newest Microbiome: Plants

    September 29, 2016

    With James "Ben" Brown, Dept. Head, Molecular Ecosystems Biology, and Chair, Environmental Bioinformatics, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the University of Birmingham; hosted by David Morris, VP Business Development, Strategic News Service


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  • Circadian Rhythms and the Flow of Biological Time

    September 28, 2016

    With Benjamin Smarr, NIH Postdoctoral Fellow, UC Berkeley; hosted by Ed Butler, Presenter and Senior Broadcast Journalist, BBC


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  • The Simplicity Behind Complexity: Do Flow and Coupling Explain Everything?

    September 28, 2016

    With Brad Holtz, CEO, Cyon Research, and Chief Nexus Officer, Coventry Computer; and Murray Cantor, CTO, Aptage, and past IBM Distinguished Engineer; hosted by Mark Anderson


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  • Visualizing Flows in Nature and Data

    September 28, 2016

    With Chris Johnson, Director, Scientific Computing and Imaging Institute (SCI), and Distinguished Professor, School of Computing, University of Utah; Alexander Lex, Assistant Professor of Computer Science at the Scientific Computing and Imaging Institute (SCI) and the School of Computing at the University of Utah and Bei Wang Phillips, Assistant Professor, School of Computing and Scientific Computing and Imaging Institute (SCI), University of Utah; Hosted by Mark Anderson


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  • Creating a Blended Reality: 3D Transformations

    October 7, 2015

    A Centerpiece Conversation: "Creating a Blended Reality: 3D Transformations": With Shane Wall, CTO, Hewlett-Packard; Hosted by Ed Butler, Senior Broadcast Journalist, BBC


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  • SNS: Special Letter: The Graphene Revolution: The Good, The Bad, And The Ugly

    July 1, 2015

    Volume 18, Issue 25
    Week of June 29, 2015

    In This Issue
    Feature: Special Letter: The Graphene Revolution: The Good, The Bad, And The Ugly
    • Background: Major Industrial Revolutions Driven by New Materials
    • The Good: Why Graphene Is Important and How to Assess Its Real Potential
    • The Bad: Solutions Looking for a Problem
    • The Ugly: Risk Factors for Technology Companies, Investors, and Corporate Partners
    • Where Are the Killer Apps? Opportunities in the Sensor Space
    • Nanotech Biomachines: From Material Supplier to Value-Add Product Developer
    • About Nanotech Biomachines
    • About Will Martinez

    ----
    Publisher's Note: I suspect that many of our members first read about graphene in the SNS Global Report. Today, there are startups worldwide, national programs in graphene commercialization and research, new laboratories for certifying graphene purity and chemical composition, a new Center of Excellence planned for creation in California, and the Graphene Stakeholders Association, co-founded by SNS member Steve Waite. (Disclosure: I am an advisory board member.)While much has been done to accelerate research and compress development times, we are still in the early days of this long-term story - which should create excitement among the entrepreneurs in the crowd. It seems as though hardly a week goes by without a new scientific discovery about graphene's growing list of electrical, chemical, and physical properties, and of their potential commercial applications.Amid all this excitement, it is important to remain aware of what is real and what is hype, and one of this year's FiReStarter companies - Nanotech Biomachines - is in the perfect position of knowing what its customers are doing with, and paying for, graphene in its many applications.Whether you are interested in computer transistors, RF transistors for cellphones, high-power batteries, more-efficient solar cells, printable electronics, flexible touch displays, wearable smart devices, or a host of other industries in which graphene now has an edge, this week's discussion by Nanotech CEO Will Martinez will likely whet your appetite for more information and steer you away from the wrong path. - mra.


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  • SNS: The Perfect Union: Biology And Computing

    June 25, 2015

    Volume 18, Issue 24
    Week of June 22, 2015

    In This Issue
    Feature: The Perfect Union: Biology And Computing
    • The Perfect Venn Intersection
    • What Is Biology?
    • What Is Evolution?
    • Computers Applied to Biology
    • Making Biology with Computers
    • Using Biology to Make Computers

    Quotes Of The Week
    Takeout Window
    • 3D Printing Human Skin
    • You Have It Backwards, Ginny: Chinese Firms Need You
    • MSFT Brings 1st Chinese University into the US; Target: University of Washington
    • Neural Lace: No Longer Just Science Fiction

    Upgrades And Numbers
    • Grexit
    • The Pope Effect
    • The OPM Hack
    • China Whistles, US Tech Firms Fetch

    Ethermail
    ----

    I was talking with my friend and colleague Larry Smarr the other day, and we found ourselves discussing the ways in which biology is today informing computer design. We started listing all the ways in which biology does things better than the old von Neumann computer structures of today, and the more we talked, the more absurdly huge these differences loomed. After a while, we just couldn't stop laughing ---There is no comparison; biology is infinitely better at what computers do than today's computers.In this week's discussion, we're going to look at how biology will inform computer design - and how compute systems will change biology.


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  • SNS: From Finches to Hawking: Giving Voice to the Brain’s Whispers

    April 30, 2015

    Volume 18, Issue 15
    Week of April 27, 2015

    In This Issue
    Feature: From Finches to Hawking: Giving Voice to the Brain's Whispers

    -----

    Publisher's Note: In a world full of interesting people, Philip Low stands out. With expertise ranging from neuroscience to mathematics, physics, electronics, business, and - close to all of our hearts - the brains of killer whales and other animals, Philip has managed to craft a career for himself that melds these into great work, great products, and high-impact discoveries. His goal: to help everyone from Stephen Hawking to big-pharma test-animals in having better lives. -mra


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  • SNS: Special Letter: An Innovator’s Handbook: Dealing with the FDA

    March 4, 2015

    Volume 18, Issue 9
    Week of March 2, 2015

    In This Issue
    SNS: Special Letter: An Innovator's Handbook: Dealing with the FDA
    • Step 1: Concept Definition
    • Step 2: Product Risk
    • Step 3: Dialog with the FDA
    • Step 4: The Paperwork
    • Step 5: Getting to Market
    • Conclusion
    • About Corinna E. Lathan

    -----

    Publisher's Note: We have been delving into the future of biology, genetics, healthcare, evolutionary theory, biofeedback systems, neurophysiology, brain-inspired computing, the Quantified Self, and medical software and devices for at least a decade. But nowhere during this thread have we touched on what is often the life-or-death issue for entrepreneurs in these arenas: dealing with US regulatory agencies.In this discussion, for the first time in our history, we're providing a deep dive into the do's and don'ts of this process, in perhaps the toughest product approval agency: the Food and Drug Administration. As many SNS members are aware, the challenges behind gaining entry to the US markets where this agency has sway are so daunting that many companies, both large and small, have turned to other international markets (Germany perhaps being first) as a quicker, cheaper way to early markets.What do entrepreneurs - and F500 CEOs - need to know about getting this done right? Read on. - mra.


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  • SNS: The Ultimate Biocomputer: Brain or Cell? Part II

    February 4, 2015

    Volume 18, Issue 5
    Week of February 2, 2015

    In This Issue
    Feature: The Ultimate Biocomputer: Brain or Cell? Part II
    • The Real Story of Cells
    • Zooming Down Through Layers of Complexity
    • Complexity Through Multitasking
    • The Cell As Computer
    • The Cytoskeleton
    • The 3D WBSS Computer / Manufacturing Platform
    • The Many RNAs
    • Things About RNA That Should Blow Your Mind
    • From Computer to Network to Computer
    • The Real Brain-Inspired Compute Environment

    Quotes of the Week
    Takeout Window
    • Cell Signaling Maps

    Upgrades and Numbers
    • Samsung Korea: The Copier Gets Copied

    Ethermail
    ----

    The cell is often portrayed improperly, in terms of parts, size, and dynamic processes. In starter classes, it is often displayed as a static thing with outsized parts one can memorize: nucleus, mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum.

    Students of all ages recall these things, with their one-paragraph descriptors, much in the vein of "the mitochondria supply energy to the cell via ATP; they are the cell's little power plants. "On this rudimentary level of understanding (which is about all I had, leaving Stanford in earlier days), the cell is seen as being relatively simple. The prevailing dogma goes something like this: DNA is a double-stranded molecule containing the instructions for life RNA copies these instructions, and runs over to the endoplasmic reticulum, where, using ribosomes, it makes proteins, which, acting as catalysts, run the cellular machine. Mitochondria provide the energy for all of this, via ATP molecules, and mitosis occurs when cells need to start over again, by dividing. The cell is a kind of wet bag of stuff, enclosed in a membrane made of lipids and other things, which lets some things in and some out.

    For most of us who were exposed to this level of education, it might be best just to wipe the blackboard clean and start over again. Yes, all of the above descriptions are essentially true; they are just drastically incomplete. So, let's reboot: 


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  • SNS: The Ultimate Biocomputer: Brain or Cell? Part I

    January 21, 2015

    Volume 18, Issue 3
    Week of January 19, 2015

    In This Issue
    Feature: The Ultimate Biocomputer: Brain or Cell? Part I
    • Understanding Neurons
    • The Internal Design
    • The Grand Design

    Quotes of the Week
    Takeout Window
    • Malware Going Exponential

    Upgrades and Numbers
    • Russia at War: Ukraine
    • Elon Musk Re-Visions Teledesic

    Ethermail
    In Case You Missed It...
    SNS Members Making News
    ----

    We have been writing about the importance of pattern recognition since 1995 - and, more recently, about the need for Pattern Recognition Processor (PRP) chips to do this specific task in computing ("SNS: The Most Important Chip Not Yet Invented," 2.12.13). SNS members have followed the recent spate of announcements in the fields of neuromorphic processors, brain-inspired design, neural networks, and artificial intelligence (which still seems like a misnomer). Clearly, from DARPA to Google, from IBM to Qualcomm, from the Allen Institutes to the EU Brain Project, something is afoot: the world has decided that biomimicry is the way to go in moving computing forward. We're copying (or "inspired by") the brain.


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  • SNS: Special Letter: On the Commercialization of Graphene and Other Nanomaterials

    January 15, 2015

    Volume 18, Issue 2
    Week of January 12, 2015
    In This Issue
    Feature: Special Letter: On the Commercialization of Graphene and Other Nanomaterials
    • "Wonder Materials"
    • The Rise of MPM
    • Addressing the Environment, Health, and Safety
    • The Nanomaterials Road Ahead
    • About Ray Gibbs

    ----

    Publisher's Note: We have been writing about graphene's potential for many years now. As SNS members know, I am on the Advisory Board of the Graphene Stakeholders Association and, more recently, of the first Graphene Center of Excellence. So I, and SNS, have put our time and money where our publications have been, working to understand and accelerate the commercialization and market uptake of this most amazing material.Recently, I had a chance to meet with Ray Gibbs, CEO of Haydale Plc, and talk with him at length about how this commercial transition will occur. He may be the best-informed person in the world on this subject, since it is his company's chosen charter, and the subject itself may be among the most important in the world. All in all, it's easy to understand why we leaped at the chance to have Ray explain his views on how and when this will happen.If members think that graphene will not impact their corner of technology, whatever it may be - from chips to planes, screens to 3D printing, future cars to wearables, fuel cells to desalinization - graphene will be there. And so will the SNS members who saw it coming, early. - mra.   


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  • SNS: Celebrating The First PRP Chip

    November 26, 2014

    Volume 17, Issue 43
    Week of November 24, 2014

    In This Issue
    Feature: Celebrating The First PRP Chip
    Quotes of the Week
    Takeout Window
    • Core of the TrueNorth Chip in Action
    • The Supporting Technologies In and Behind TrueNorth

    Upgrades And Numbers
    • "Ideas into Actions: Global Threats / Global Solutions"

    Ethermail
    In Case You Missed It...
    SNS Members Making News
    ----

    Cognitive computing has received an increasing amount of attention recently, as those who have been touting the Big Data problem /opportunity have come up against the rather obvious challenge: how to deal with it most effectively? The scientists, academicians, policymakers, and business leaders who worry about these things have been working for years on a large problem set, essentially under the rubric of "brain-inspired computing." These new efforts include new theories about brain function, new MRI and fMRI studies, new work in neural networks and asynchronous computing, new chips, new languages, and new hardware and software on every level.In a sense, these experts have approached the problem by assuming that the brain, as a product of evolution, has achieved goals in low-power, high-performance computing that are so advanced as to deserve biomimetic engineering; and by working to emulate a number of the brain's structures and functions in order to vault modern computing forward by some huge factor.


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  • Artificial Intelligence Helping Humans: Future Research

    May 21, 2014

    A discussion with Peter Lee, Corporate VP and Head of Microsoft Research, Microsoft; hosted by Ed Butler, Presenter, BBC


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  • Commercializing Space: From the Moon to Mars

    May 21, 2014

    FiRe 2014: "Commercializing Space: From the Moon to Mars": Patti Grace Smith and Michael Sims; hosted by Larry Smarr


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  • Outer Space Commerce: Increasing Humanity’s Prosperity on a Global Scale

    May 20, 2014

    FiRe 2014: Dinner Presentation: "Outer Space Commerce: Increasing Humanity's Prosperity on a Global Scale": Chris Lewicki; hosted by Mark Anderson


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  • SNS: Special Letter: Decoding DNA: The Other 97%, in Real Time

    May 15, 2014

    Volume 17, Issue 19
    Week of May 12, 2014
    In This Issue
    Feature: Special Letter: Decoding DNA: The Other 97%, In Real Time
    • The Historic Standard
    • The Four Bases of DNA
    • "Transcription" and "Translation": Reading DNA and RNA
    • Epigenetics
    • Genomics, Non-Coding Portions, and Cancer
    • The Influence, and Limitations, of Sanger Sequencing
    • Current Limits
    • A Bacteria-Derived Polymerase: "A Puzzle in Which All Pieces Are Square"
    • The Importance of the Non-Coding Protein Region
    • Enter Exonucleases
    • Adaptation to Direct Sequencing of RNA
    • Looking Beyond the Exome
    • About Edward Arvisais

    ---

    Publisher's Note: This week's issue is an absolute Must Read for anyone interested in the future of genetics, healthcare, biomedicine, and related issues. If you need to understand how DNA works, and - more important from a pragmatic perspective - how our current techniques fail to reveal real DNA sequences, and how to fix the problem, read on. SNS members are aware that we long ago warned about the use of the term "junk" DNA: nature, in its evolutionary cloak, abhors not only a vacuum, but also any waste in energy or structure. This week's issue will help members understand why all base pairs should be considered to have been conserved for a purpose, and how important it is to read them - and How to read them.We are now leaving the first- and second- generation worlds of genetic decoding, when we all picked the low-hanging fruit and just ignored the rest. Thanks to companies like NorthShore Bio, a company we are proud to have as a FiReStarter Company this year, we are now going to go back, go deeper, and get the real story, the whole story, the complete read of our genetic codes. - mra.


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  • SNS: Science Into Technology

    April 9, 2014

    Volume 17, Issue 14
    Week of April 7, 2014
    In This Issue
    Feature: Science Into Technology
    • Genetics
    • Cancer
    • Fixing Healthcare I
    • Fixing Healthcare II
    • Graphene, Graphene, Graphene
    • Advanced Weapons I
    • Advanced Weapons II
    • Deep Science I
    • Deep Science II

    Quotes of the Week
    Upgrades
    • Chinese IP Theft: The Economist Gets It; CEOs Don't
    • Stock Values #1: A Tech Wreck, or Just "Zucked"?
    • Stock Values #2: The China Syndrome

    Takeout Window
    • We Told You Fox News Coverage Was Neither Fair Nor Balanced - Nor True
    • Lasers Go to Sea

    Ethermail
    In Case You Missed It...
    SNS Members Making News
    ---

    Although it takes less than a genius to add time-lining to a social networking site, it is still hard not to feel a bit amazed at the pace of scientific discovery and its subsequent conversion into useful applications. For technoids, the pace of real innovation used to be centered around personal computers, servers, pads, and smartphones - i.e., computing and communications device features. But for the last few years, that innovation has gone instead into making things smaller and cheaper, but not terrifically different.


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  • Taking Voice Digitization Beyond Words

    May 23, 2013

    "Taking Voice Digitization Beyond Words": A conversation with Peter Mahoney, CMO, Nuance Communications; Cary Bran, Senior Director, Innovation and New Ventures, Plantronics; and Kirsten Bay, President and CEO, Attensity Group; hosted by Stephen Socolof, Managing Partner, New Venture Partners


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  • SNS: The Most Important Chip Not Yet Invented

    February 14, 2013

    Volume 16, Issue 6
    Week of February 11, 2013
    In This Issue
    Feature: The Most Important Chip Not Yet Invented
    • Reducing the Instruction Set
    • PRPs
    • The Importance of Patterns
    • Be the Pattern
    • Evolved Clues
    • Find the Element
    • Patterns in Space
    • Patterns in Time
    • Complexity

    Quotes of the Week
    Upgrades
    • Lenovo Put SNS' "Wall Computing" on the Table

    Takeout Window
    • A Prototypical Digital Signal Processor Chip
    • Solar Canals: Implementing a FiRe CTO Design Challenge

    Ethermail
    In Case You Missed It...
    Members Making News---

    Reducing the Instruction Set

    Imagine a blank touchscreen. You draw an irregular line across it, from edge to edge. Then you turn over the 5-minute sand clock next to you. Your life depends upon finding the area under that line.Now let's say you are a Ph.D. in advanced mathematics. Obviously, you are going to apply some form of calculus to describe each portion of this constantly changing curve, set various rectangular artificial box boundaries with finite known areas below it, and then calculate the remaining areas in ever-smaller increments, depending on the computing power and time at your disposal.

    Or, you could do finite-element analysis, or try to fit Fast Fourier transforms into the shape of the line on ever-smaller sections, or find one of a thousand other clever ways to solve this problem. In each case, you would be able to use a computer for assistance, which helps. You could program the computer to look at the line from the aspects described above, turning it into finite elements of varying lengths, each with its own straight-line tangential slope approximation. Or you could run other programs to fit your other ideas.In virtually every instance, however, the computer would need to use sensors - and probably some form of analog/digital converter, most likely a digital signal processor (DSP) chip in the middle - perhaps then reconvert the answer into analog, and format appropriate outputs, while doing all of the serious math in the digital domain, for every data point. So, add a bit of latency here per each calculation. Not much sand left. Or (aha!) you could just ---


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  • SNS: Special Letter: Graphene and Global Warming

    January 30, 2013

    Volume 16, Issue 4
    Week of January 28, 2013
    In This Issue
    Feature: Special Letter: Graphene And Global Warming
    • What Is the Problem? or, The Legacy of Bubbles
    • We Are a Bubble
    • Bursting the Bubble of Denial
    • The Role of Graphene
    • Understanding Graphene's Potential
    • A Cause for Hope and "Right Action"
    • About Jon Myers

    ----

    Publisher's Note: It is often said that the average human being literally lacks the ability to comprehend second-order rates of change: straight lines, OK - but increasing increases, no. That's too bad, as this is the shape of most human-caused problems. Worse, this shape, representing self-reinforcing problems, gets out of control much faster than do straight-line problems, often ending up in a veritable black hole from which there is no chance of solution.Another issue most people face in understanding complex problems is quite direct: the solutions are also complex. And, it seems, most people are not very good at understanding, or supporting, solutions that have more than one moving part.

    This is exactly the case for solving the problem of Global Warming. Energy-based solutions alone (e.g., reduce coal burning, when possible) won't do it. We know from past work by the CTO Design Challenge results at FiRe that even a single set of answers isn't enough: there will need to be a set of transition ("good enough") solutions put into practice immediately, followed by a second set of solutions that are better yet.

    Last year, SNS members read about a new proposal from us called "Twinning," which involves linking the problems caused by CO2 created during coal and petro burning for energy, with the idea of a vast new sustainable materials cycle. By taking the carbon from CO2 and creating a new planetary economy in an amazing new class of superior, carbon-based construction materials, we suggested that we could solve the global warming problem, solve the problem of constant resource exhaustion and waste, and make some money for those taking the risk.

    At that time, I thought the answer was carbon nanotubes, but a review of a combination of potential health issues gave me (and others) pause: small fibers, after all, caused asbestosis. At the same time, a second look at the requirement for a universal geometry on the nano scale convinced me that I was wrong, and that the best solution would be flat sheets of carbon, 1 atom thick - or "graphene."Last month, the UK made the same decision, announcing a new government-sponsored R&D effort focused in Manchester (and quickly picked up by Cambridge). Two weeks ago, the EU followed suit. Having been in touch with the White House on this question since last November, we have strong hopes that the US, too, will get into this game, before it's too late.

    If we're right about the potential of graphene, it will be the building block with which a very large part of the future world is created. Jon Myers, CEO of Graphene Technologies (a 2013 FiReStarter Company), saw this problem early, and has created a novel, proprietary solution which will hopefully accelerate the idea of placing a graphene plant next to every coal plant in the world, turning 100% of the CO2 into a valuable graphene feedstock, the centerpiece of the Twinning concept.

    At the end of this issue, members will note a new feature which we felt would be particularly helpful in this discussion: a Resource List of articles on graphene from the UK and US, the latter a part of a longer list recommended to us by the White House. I believe everyone should read this letter carefully, regardless of one's current job or interests: it addresses the creation of a new path for the survival of our species. - mra.


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  • “Connecting Digital Earths”

    October 4, 2012

    An SNS Weekly Report, including Building the Sensor Planet; M2M and Nature; Earth II and World Wind; Commercial vs. Academic Earths; Uniting Worlds; and The Reality Machine and the Global Prediction Machine


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  • “What Mars Means to Earth”

    August 28, 2012

    Mark Anderson discusses how the "August 5th Mars landing is more than just another triumph for NASA; it's a reminder that science is reality," with KPLU's Dave Meyer and in an SNS Special Alert.


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  • “Turing’s Cathedral: The Origins of the Digital Universe”

    May 25, 2012

    Histories of Exceptional Individuals and Scientific Breakthroughs”: With George Dyson, historian of technology, and author of the new book of the same name; hosted by Don Budinger, Chair and Founding Director, The Rodel Foundations


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  • “From Carbon to Carbon”

    May 24, 2012

    With David Sarna, CEO, WoodallTech; and Dan Simon, President and CEO, Heliae; hosted by Glen Hiemstra, Founder, Futurist.com


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  • “Using Patterns to Understand Animal Language”

    May 24, 2012

    A conversation with Con Slobodchikoff, Professor Emeritus of Biology, Northern Arizona University, and CEO, Animal Communications Ltd.; hosted by Roger Payne, Founder and President, Ocean Alliance


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  • Dinner Presentation: “From Reading to Writing the Genetic Code”

    May 22, 2012

    J. Craig Venter, Chair, CEO, and Co-Chief Scientific Officer, Synthetic Genomics


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  • “Understanding and Integrating Evolution”

    March 13, 2012

    An SNS Weekly Report, including Multiple Input Genetics: An Evolutionary Theory; What Steve Saw; The Act of Creation; and Accelerating


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  • “Quantified Health: Towards Digitally Enabled Genomic Medicine”

    September 29, 2011

    An SNS Special Letter, written by Pure Science Ambassador Larry Smarr


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  • “Resonance Theory”

    July 28, 2011

    The Unification of Relativity and Quantum Physics Through the Electromagnetic and Mass Properties of Empty Space


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  • “Remote Viewing in Underwater Cities”

    May 27, 2011

    With John Delaney, Professor, School of Oceanography and Paros Endowed Chair for Sensor Networks, and Director and PI for the Regional Cabled Observatory of NSF’s OOI; and Doug Stanley, CEO and Co-Founder, Ridgeline Entertainment; hosted by Michael Pfeffer, Managing Partner, Kolohala Ventures


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  • “Special Showing: Are We Loving Them to Death?”

    May 26, 2011

    A KCPQ-TV production: How SNS’ Orca Relief contributed to new federal protection for Killer Whales; with Pam Pearson, SVP/General Manager, KCPQ/KZJO-TV and Tribune Broadcasting Co.; hosted by Mark Anderson


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  • “The Next Space”

    April 7, 2011

    An SNS Weekly Report on Convergent Evolution and Changing Systems


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  • “The Role of Science”

    March 9, 2011

    An SNS Weekly Report on "The Role of Science," including Intellectual Property; A Closer Look at Science Today; and Can Science Be Fixed?


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  • “Puget Sound Whales: Minkes at 30 Years”

    November 11, 2010

    The longest longitudinal study of the world's most hunted whales; with Jonathan Stern, Minke Whale Project Lead and Professor, Marine Ecosystems, San Francisco State University; hosted by Russ Daggatt, General Partner, Denny Hill Capital


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  • “Searching for Life on Mars”

    May 14, 2010

    With Steve Squyres, Principal Investigator of the Mars Exploration Rover Mission, and Professor of Astronomy, Cornell University; hosted by Larry Smarr, Director, California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology (Calit2), UCSD and Irvine


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  • “Blast Off! From Launching Private Rockets to the Next Electric Cars”

    May 20, 2009

    A conversation with Elon Musk, CEO, Space Exploration Technologies (SpaceX) and Tesla Motors; hosted by Mark Anderson


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  • “The Whale and the Wind Turbine: Biomimicry and Design”

    May 23, 2007

    A conversation with Janine Benyus, President, Biomimicry Institute; hosted by Cynthia Figge, EKOS International.


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  • “An Ocean of Genes: The CAMERA Project”

    May 22, 2007

    Dinner Presentation: J.Craig Venter, Founder, Chairman and President, J. Craig Venter Institute


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Leaders in This Focus Channel

  • Dan Simon

    President and CEO, Heliae Technology Holdings Inc.

  • Ramez Naam

    Author; Computer Scientist; and Energy & Environmental Systems Faculty, Singularity University

  • Bei Wang Phillips

    Assistant Professor, School of Computing; and Faculty Member, SCI Institute, University of Utah

  • Robert Anderson

    Chairman and CEO, Hybrid Electric Vehicle Technologies and HEVT LLC

  • James Hayward

    Chairman, President, and CEO, Applied DNA Sciences

  • Shane Wall

    CTO, Hewlett-Packard

  • Tony Lammers

    President and CEO, MAR Systems Inc.

  • Murray Cantor

    CTO, Aptage

  • Patrick Hogan

    Project Director, NASA World Wind

  • Heather Richman

    VP Government Relations & External Affairs, HEVT

  • Craig Venter

    Co-Founder, Chair, CEO, and Co-Chief Scientific Officer, Synthetic Genomics Inc.

  • James Brown

    Dept. Head, Molecular Ecosystems Biology, and Chair, Environmental Bioinformatics, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

  • Michael Sims

    Founder and CEO, Ceres Robotics

  • Miriah Meyer

    Assistant Professor, School of Computing, University of Utah

  • Patti Grace Smith

    Aerospace Consultant, Patti Grace Smith Consulting LLC

More Thought Leaders

iNews

  • Non-von Neumann Computers Providing Brain-like Functionality

    Tue, 21 Nov 2017 01:04:00 -0800

    The leader of IBM's TrueNorth e-brain chips project, IBM Fellow (and 2006 ACM Gordon Bell Prize recipient) Dharmendra Modha, says the company has demonstrated how its ultra-low-power TrueNorth Neurosynaptic System can be integrated with ultra-low-power ...

  • New York affirms corporate and venture capital synergies

    Mon, 20 Nov 2017 22:49:00 -0800

    There then followed a panel on artificial intelligence and fintech, moderated by Jaidev Shergill, head of the growth ventures division of Capital One bank. An anecdote was related by George Hoyem, managing director of In-Q-Tel, the US intelligence ...

  • For developers, Microsoft’s AI future gets a foundation

    Mon, 20 Nov 2017 19:02:00 -0800

    In fact, the first time I talked to Microsoft about its deep-learning machine learning work was a conversation about that basic research back in 2014 with Peter Lee, now Microsoft Research’s leader for AI. So how do you start using these tools in your ...

  • Donald Trump’s Justice Department Files Suit To Block AT&T-Time Warner Deal –...

    Mon, 20 Nov 2017 04:07:00 -0800

    AT&T issued a statement strongly criticizing the DOJ’s actions, arguing that the combination of AT&T’s television, wireless and broadband businesses ... Telecommunications industry analyst Chetan Sharma said the antitrust division’s actions may ...

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